Food Allergy and Your Kiddo https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com Your source for tactical, family-focused, evidence-based food allergy information. Sat, 03 Dec 2022 12:48:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Hoyt-butterfly-logo-512-×-512-px-150x150.png Food Allergy and Your Kiddo https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com 32 32 Fun, Screen-Free Activities for Kiddos During Long Appointments https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/fun-screen-free-activities-for-kiddos-during-long-appointments/ Sat, 03 Dec 2022 12:48:17 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=14572 Parents of kiddos with food allergies and other medical conditions know the challenges of taking kiddos to long doctors' appointments. How can you keep your kiddo or multiple kiddos occupied without having them stare at screens for hours on end? We've got the screen-free activities and strategies!

On this episode of the Food Allergy and Your Kiddo Podcast, Pam and Dr. Hoyt interview Dr. Betty Choi about screen-free activities that are fun and doable. Dr. Choi is a board-certified pediatrician, former home educator, children's book author, and the mom of a kiddo with food allergy and a kiddo without food allergy. During this interview, Dr. Choi shares her family's experiences with long appointments as part of their OIT journey and focuses on four key components to having a successful doctor's appointment with screen-free activities.

What's in Dr. Choi's bag?

Dr. Choi discusses in this episode that she has four components to her appointment bag:

  • Safe snacks, some chosen by her and some chosen by her kiddo
  • Extra set of clothing
  • Epinephrine auto-injector
  • Fun activities, some chosen by her and some chosen by her kiddo

Tune in to this podcast episode in which Pam and Dr. Hoyt talk with Dr. Betty Choi about fun, screen-free activities to keep your kiddo entertained at doctors' appointments!

screen-free activities podcast

Thanks for reading this post “Fun, Screen-Free Activities for Kiddos During Long Appointments.” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Sign up for our newsletter where you can submit your questions and stay up-to-date on all things food allergy and YOUR kiddo!


    Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

    AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
    ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
    https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist
    OIT Allergist Finder: https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


    Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

    Submit your questions HERE!


    A note from Dr. Hoyt

    I have talked about a non-profit…

    Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

    Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

    A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

    Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


    You've just read our post “Fun, Screen-Free Activities for Kiddos During Long Appointments.” Remember, Dr. Hoyt is an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

    ]]>
    Oral immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy – for your kiddo? https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/oral-immunotherapy-and-sublingual-immunotherapy-for-your-kiddo/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 11:43:54 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=14424 If you are one of the millions of American parents whose kiddo has food allergies, you know how much extra effort goes into keeping your kiddo safe while living with this condition. Like many parents, this may cause you much anxiety, and you've wished there was a way to help keep your kiddo safe. Until recently, allergists had few therapies to offer patients with food allergies. But now oral immunotherapy (OIT) and even sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) are becoming more accessible. But what really is OIT and SLIT, and who are good candidates for these treatments?

    Scroll down to hear the podcast episode in which Dr. Hoyt discusses OIT and SLIT with her allergist colleague Dr. Hugh Windom.

    “What is Oral Immunotherapy (OIT)?”

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is one method of treating food allergies. It involves gradually exposing patients to the allergen in question. This continued exposure teaches the immune system to tolerate the food. This thereby diminishes the likelihood of having a severe allergic reaction when an accidental ingestion occurs. This accidental-ingestion protection is commonly referred to as being “bite-proof” as the patient is able to ingest a bite of the allergen and not react. Some patients who undergo OIT end up being able to “free-eat,” meaning they can eat as much of the food as they'd like as long as they keep the food in the diet regularly.

    The Phases of OIT

    The Escalation Phase

    The oral immunotherapy process involves having the patient eat gradually increasing amounts of the allergen. Initial dosing is incredibly small and may include multiple tiny doses or one tiny dose. This is called the “escalation phase.” Whether multiple doses or a single starting dose is performed, the dose the patient will begin taking at home the following day is just as tiny as that starting dosing. And that dose is TINY. For example, in peanut OIT, a patient's first dose may be ~3mg of peanut protein, compared to a peanut containing ~300mg of peanut protein. Doses are ingested daily under strict safety guidelines, and patients return to the allergist's office every 1-2 weeks or less frequently to increase the amount of allergen. This is called “up-dosing.”

    The Up-Dosing Phase

    The “up-dosing” phase of oral immunotherapy can last months to sometimes years, depending on multiple medical and non-medical factors. Medical factors may include spacing out the up-dose appointments due to the patients having a reaction or other medical issues going on that could increase the risk of a reaction. Non-medical factors may include the family traveling or the patient having a heavy school or activities schedule that makes attending up-dosing appointments too stressful for a season, which is fine! This comes back to the goals of OIT, such as improved quality of life. Learn more about the goals of oral immunotherapy with this quick video Q&A (#5).

    The Maintenance Phase

    When a patient reaches the “maintenance” phase of oral immunotherapy the same dose is continued daily, and the patient may be “bite-proof” at this point. This is where allergists' protocols tend to vary in how long a patient needs to be on the maintenance dose before doing an ingestion challenge. This ingestion challenge will help the allergist determine whether the patient can now tolerate larger amounts of the allergen. This is the gateway into free-eating.

    The Tolerance Preservation Phase

    Because there is limited data on how long which patients need to stay on maintenance to sustain their newly formed tolerance, allergists' protocols tend to vary on what a patient's dosing should look like during this post-challenge phase. Dr. Hoyt refers to this phase as the “Tolerance Preservation” phase of oral immunotherapy.

    Learn more about OIT in this course: Oral Immunotherapy: Primer for Parents.

    “What is Sublingual Immunotherapy (SLIT)?”

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) follows a lot of the same processes as oral immunotherapy, but there are a few major differences. Instead of oral dosing (meaning the dose is swallowed), sublingual immunotherapy dosing is done under the tongue. This is why it's called “sublingual” immunotherapy. Also, the safety measures are less robust because there seems to be less likelihood of reaction to SLIT. While sublingual immunotherapy may cause fewer reactions in patients, it also may not result in the degree of tolerance a patient is seeking. Also, most young children are unable to hold the SLIT dose under their tongues, so it rarely is a good option for them.

    “What about avoidance – is that still a good management option?”

    Absolutely! Avoidance is still a good management plan for patients with food allergies. Many teens and young adults are busy with important school and extracurricular activities that make participating in oral immunotherapy or sublingual immunotherapy difficult, and many older adults have been living with their food allergy for so long that they don't feel the need to make a change. It's critical to consider all aspects of OIT, SLIT, and avoidance and to discuss with your allergist your goals as well as the risks and benefits to all approaches to decide the best path for you.

    Tune in to this podcast episode in which Dr. Hoyt discusses oral immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy with her allergist colleague Dr. Hugh Windom.


    Thanks for reading this post “Oral immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy – for your kiddo?” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Sign up for our newsletter where you can submit your questions and stay up-to-date on all things food allergy and YOUR kiddo!


      Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

      AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
      ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
      https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist
      OIT Allergist Finder: https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


      Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

      Submit your questions HERE!


      A note from Dr. Hoyt

      I have talked about a non-profit…

      Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

      Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

      A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

      Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


      You've just read our post “Oral immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy – for your kiddo?” Remember, Dr. Hoyt is an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

      ]]>
      Inside the Mind of a Food Allergist: Types of Food Allergies https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/inside-the-mind-of-a-food-allergist-types-of-food-allergies/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 20:09:54 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=14415 Have you ever wondered what a food allergist is thinking when he or she is asking you so so so many specific questions? And why he or she keeps interrupting you to get very minute details about your kiddo's story? It's because the food allergist is trying to determine what type of adverse reaction occurred!

      How many types of food allergies and other adverse reactions to foods exist?

      Many many many!

      Kiddos – and adults – can have one (or more!) of many types of reactions to foods. These reactions can be immune-mediated or have nothing really to do with the immune system.

      Non-Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions to Foods

      Non-immune-mediated reactions are just that: your body responding to a food, but the immune system is not the main player. An example includes the jitteriness that can occur with drinking caffeine. Another example is the food poisoning that occurs after eating contaminated fish.

      Immune-Mediated Adverse Reactions to Foods

      Adverse reactions to foods that do involve the immune system include both IgE- and non-IgE-mediated food allergies. Also, Celiac Disease is an immune-mediated reaction to a food. Immune reactions are either IgE-mediated or they don't rely on IgE for the reaction. IgE-mediated food allergies can result in anaphylaxis. Non-IgE-mediated food allergies do not cause anaphylaxis but can still result in significant symptoms.

      Don't miss Dr. Hoyt describing the many types of adverse reactions to foods in this episode of the podcast!

      food allergist Dr. Alice Hoyt

      Thanks for reading this post “Inside the Mind of a Food Allergist: Types of Food Allergies.” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Sign up for our newsletter where you can submit your questions and stay up-to-date on all things food allergy and YOUR kiddo!


        Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

        AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
        ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
        https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist
        OIT Allergist Finder: https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


        Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

        Submit your questions HERE!


        A note from Dr. Hoyt

        I have talked about a non-profit…

        Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

        Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

        A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

        Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


        You've just read our post “Inside the Mind of a Food Allergist: Types of Food Allergies.” Remember, Dr. Hoyt is an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

        ]]>
        Eczema and Food Allergies: Further Clarifying the Connections https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/eczema-and-food-allergies-further-clarifying-the-connections/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 10:28:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=14136 ***If you haven't yet read the previous post “Eczema and Food Allergies: Clarifying the Connections,” we recommend you check it out then read this post!***

        What is the connection between eczema and food allergies?

        Eczema, an inflammatory skin condition, impacts nearly 1 in 5 children. Its cause is thought to be multifactorial, but foods are not a cause of eczema. In fact, it's eczema that predisposes children to having food allergies.

        How does the skin play such an important role in food allergies?

        The waltz of the skin and the bacteria

        The skin is the largest immune organ. It's the barrier that prevents us from getting all sorts of infections. The skin does this by being a physical barrier but also permits “good” bacteria to live on its surface. The skin and its immune system is constantly waltzing with the outside world, especially bacteria, many of which help keep the skin happy. Some bacteria, however, are not beneficial to the skin, especially in the case of eczema, and those “bad” bacteria can play a role in the flaring eczema.

        An impaired skin barrier can lead to the development of IgE (allergic antibodies)

        The immune system within the skin is especially designed to help prevent parasites from infecting the body. Interestingly, some of the same immune machinery used to prevent those parasite infections is what is used during allergic reactions.

        Before a person can have a food-induced IgE-mediated allergic reaction, that person must have IgE to that food, e.g. they must be sensitized to the food. How and why exactly the human body has begun developing IgE to foods remains unclear. Foods, such as peanuts, are not parasites, so why are peanut being treated almost as if they do pose danger? That is what the wonderful food allergy researchers are trying to determine.

        What is known is that children with eczema are at increased risk of developing food allergies. Also, in mouse models, we know that sensitization can occur when peanut is exposed to impaired skin. Eczema causes an increase in the amount of moisture lost from the skin, such as trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL). TEWL is measured with a wand-like instrument that sits on the skin and literally measures the amount of moisture – water – exiting the skin. Because water loss occurs in eczema, it's important to add moisture to the skin (see “Eczema and Food Allergies: Clarifying the Connections“).

        What about filaggrin?

        So why does anyone even have eczema? Many cases are associated with a defect in the filaggrin gene. Filaggrin plays a role in creating a strong skin barrier, and a defective filaggrin gene results in skin barrier dysfunction. Such dysfunction leads to increased TEWL. The loss of moisture from skin leaves the skin at risk of dryness, cracking, and, in the case of eczema, flaring.

        So what helps eczema?

        Skincare strategies for eczema should be discussed with your physician. You likely will be advised to follow a skincare plan the decreases inflammation while increasing hydration. Here are some ways your physician may recommend that be accomplished.

        Decreasing Skin Inflammation

        Topical steroids are some of the most common medications to diminish inflammation. Some are even available over-the-counter. Steroids range in potency, so it's critical to know when and where and how long to use which topical steroids. There are also non-steroidal medications, such as Eucrisa and Dupixent, that are used to treat eczema.

        Your physician may also recommend bleach baths. Bleach baths do not sterilize the skin, rather they improve the skin's environment such that good bacteria live there happily and bad bacteria are unwelcome. While many physicians find bleach baths helpful, some studies suggest that regular water baths can be as effective. When doing bleach baths, it's important to use the correct amount of bleach for the amount of water. Here is a link to the recipe for bleach baths, and check out the video below.

        Increasing Skin Hydration

        This is where baths are again relevant. Bathing in warm water and limiting soaps, which can be drying and contain fragrance and other skin irritants, helps improve the skin's moisture. Upon exiting the bath tub, blotting as opposed to rubbing the skin dry, then immediately applying a thick emollient, helps seal in the moisture (this is also when topical anti-inflammation meds, such as steroids, are especially well applied). In many cases, emollients are applies multiple times per day. It's critical to focus on moisture whether the eczema is flaring or appears healed.

        If your child has eczema and/or food allergies…

        Talk with your allergist about a clear plan of management for both these conditions. Both eczema and food allergies are conditions that can be very challenging, especially given the significant discomfort and pain that eczema can cause as well as the anxiety that eczema and food allergies can cause. Remember, continue to seek evidence-based information to inform your discussions with your allergist, and your journey will be all the smoother!

        Tune in to this episode to learn all the connections between eczema and food allergies!

        Eczema Episode Part 2

        Thanks for reading this post “Eczema and Food Allergies: Further Clarifying the Connections.” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Sign up for our newsletter where you can submit your questions and stay up-to-date on all things food allergy and YOUR kiddo!


          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist
          OIT Allergist Finder: https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read our post “Eczema and Food Allergies: Further Clarifying the Connections.” Remember, Dr. Hoyt is an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          Eczema and Food Allergies: Clarifying the Connections https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/eczema-and-food-allergies-clarifying-the-connections/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 09:40:56 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=14034 If you have a child with eczema or food allergy or both, chances are you've wondered what causes these two disorders. In fact, there's absolutely a strong connection between the two.

          But that connection may not be what you think it is.

          What is Eczema?

          Eczema is an inflammatory skin condition that causes red, itchy patches. These patches can become infected and can be very difficult to treat. One type of eczema is atopic dermatitis, which is a form of eczema that impacts nearly 1 in 5 children.

          What causes eczema?

          What causes eczema is thought to be multifactorial. Epigenetics plays a big role. Epigenetics is the way our environments interact with our genetic make-up and, simply stated, caused genes to be turn off and turned on. One gene that plays a strong role in eczema is the filaggrin gene, which contributes to skin integrity. If the filaggrin gene is mutated, then the skin integrity can be diminished, essentially resulting in weaker skin. The microbiome – which is the composition of microbes on the skin – also impacts the skin barrier.

          How are eczema and food allergies related?

          Many people think that food allergies cause eczema. Actually, eczema predisposes to food allergies. Why eczema does this is unclear but is thought to be due to the impact eczema has on the immune system.

          The skin is the largest immune organ.

          The immune system within the skin is constantly surveilling the environment above and below the skin. For example, imagine the skin is a fort and immune system within the skin the military. When that fort wall is damaged, the military is immediately activated and wages war. This is similar to what happens with eczema. When the immune system of the skin becomes activated due to eczema, those immune components result in the creation of allergic conditions. The immune machinery that plays a role in keeping our bodies safe from germs that try to attack us through are skin is the same immune machinery involved in allergies, including food allergies.

          Can foods flare eczema?

          While foods do not cause eczema, some foods can flare eczema in some individuals. This is causes food-induced flaring of atopic dermatitis. While it may seem ideal to simply try to avoid trigger foods, that decision should be made with careful consideration. That's because prolonged avoidance of these foods could increase the likelihood of developing IgE-mediated (anaphylactic) food allergies. Instead of prolonged avoidance of a trigger food, many food allergists recommend initiating and aggressive skincare regimen while temporarily (e.g. maybe for a week) avoiding a food. The aggressive skin care regimen include strategies to both 1) decrease inflammation, and 2) increase hydration.

          If your child has eczema and/or food allergies…

          Be sure to have a clear plan of management for both these conditions. These plans should be developed with your allergist. Both of these conditions can be very challenging, especially given the significant discomfort and pain that eczema can cause as well as the anxiety that eczema and food allergies can cause. Remember, continue to seek evidence-based information to inform your discussions with your allergist, and your journey will be all the smoother.

          Tune in to this episode to learn all the connections between eczema and food allergies!

          Eczema and Food Allergies

          Thanks for reading this post “Eczema and Food Allergies: Clarifying the Connections.” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!

          food allergy testing ebook

          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist
          OIT Allergist Finder: https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read our post “Eczema and Food Allergies: Clarifying the Connections.” Remember, Dr. Hoyt is an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          Preventing nut allergies, one puff at a time https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/preventing-nut-allergies-one-puff-at-a-time/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=13277 When it comes to feeding babies, all parents want to get it right. This is especially true when those parents are trying to introduce foods to their babies to prevent the development of food allergies like peanut allergy. Can food allergies like nut allergies be prevented? If so, does preventing nut allergies have to be complicated?

          Sometimes, food allergies can be prevented.

          The LEAP and LEAP On studies, led by Dr. Gideon Lack, showed that peanut allergy can be prevented when peanut protein is incorporated into babies' diets from a young age, as early as four months. In this research, these were babies who were at high risk of developing peanut allergy. Those babies who consumed at least two grams of peanut protein per week until their fifth birthdays were significantly less likely to develop peanut allergy than high-risk babies who strictly avoided peanut.

          Preventing food allergies doesn't have to be complicated.

          Since 2017, the NIAID and non-government, academic medical organizations recommended peanuts be introduced to high-risk babies as early as 4 months of age. Other common allergens have also been recommended for early introduction. Kids who participate in early introduction are those who have been deemed by their physicians to be tolerant to that food (i.e. NOT allergic). The goal of incorporating peanut into these kids diets is to grow the tolerance those children already have. That said, these recommendations have not been universally adopted.

          The lack of universal adoption of early introduction likely is due in part to the difficulty in feeding babies some allergens, such as peanuts and tree nuts. These are choking hazards so cannot be given in their most basic form. This leaves diluting sticky nut butters with water as one way to provides babies these foods. Given the logistics of feeding babies these foods, companies have been developing safe, fun, healthy, nutritious ways to feed babies and young children nut protein. The goal: preventing nut allergies. One of those companies is Mission MightyMe.

          A company on a Mission – Mission MightyMe

          Mission MightyMe is a food company that began as an idea of Catherine and J.J. Jaxon – the parents of three, the oldest of whom has food allergy. Catherine and J.J. wanted to do everything they could to prevent their two younger children from developing food allergies. They stayed up-to-date on the most recent research and immediately adopted the LEAP study findings. But they found it difficult due to the lack of products available. The main peanut-containing, baby-friendly-texture food at that time was Bamba. Catherine and J.J. wanted an organic, lower-sodium option, and they wanted to de-medicalize the process. Reminder: kids who participate in early introduction are those who have been deemed by their physicians to be tolerant – NOT allergic – to that food. To create a nutritious, age-appropriate, evidence-based food, they collaborated with Dr. Gideon Lack and FARE-founder Todd Slotkin, and Mission MightyMe was born.

          Tune in to this episode to learn about preventing nut allergies, one puff at a time!

          Preventing Nut Allergies

          BONUS: Use discount code KIDDO20 to save 20% on your order from Mission MightyMe!


          Thanks for reading this post “Preventing nut allergies, one puff at a time.” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!

          food allergy testing ebook

          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist
          OIT Allergist Finder: https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read our post “Preventing nut allergies, one puff at a time.” Remember, Dr. Hoyt is an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          3 Back-to-School Strategies for Food Allergy Families https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/3-back-to-school-strategies-for-food-allergy-families/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 12:28:43 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=11082 Back-to-school time can be both exciting and nerve-wracking, especially for food allergy families. Meeting new teachers and starting new classes can be stressful enough, but add food allergy management to the mix, and the worry factor can jump ten-fold. But rest easy! Food allergy mom Pam Lestage and food allergist Dr. Hoyt recently discussed their three simple strategies to an awesome back-to-school. Check out this episode of the podcast for all the details, but here is an overview!

          Back-to-School Strategy #1

          Visit your allergist.

          Getting a back-to-school appointment is always a good idea, but if your child has food allergies, it’s especially important to visit your allergist before the school year begins. Reviewing your child’s symptoms and triggers, updating their treatment plan, and making sure they have the tools they need, like epinephrine, can help you and your child feel prepared and confident going into the new school year. This is also a great time to discuss new therapies, like OIT, and plan how to navigate therapies during the new school year!

          doctor food allergy back to school

          Back-to-School Strategy #2

          Meet with your school nurse and teachers.

          One of the best things you can do to help your child manage their food allergies at school is to meet with your child's school nurse and teachers. Make an appointment to meet with them before the school year begins. During the meeting, you can go over your child’s allergies, symptoms, and treatment plan. You can also provide a list of safe foods and snacks for your child.

          parent teacher back to school

          Back-to-School Strategy #3

          Review your anaphylaxis action plan and practice it with your kiddo.

          Anaphylaxis is a serious, potentially life-threatening reaction to a trigger food. If your child has food allergies, you need to have an anaphylaxis action plan in place. This plan should be reviewed and practiced with your child before the school year begins. Make sure your child knows what to do if they have a reaction, and make sure they know how to use their epinephrine auto-injector (pending they are at an age where you and your allergist feel this can be done properly).

          happy guy back to school

          You've Got This!

          By following these three simple back-to-school strategies, you can help your child manage those food allergies and have a great school year!

          food allergy back to school

          Thanks for reading this post “3 Back-to-School Strategies for Food Allergy Families.” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!

          food allergy testing ebook

          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist
          OIT Allergist Finder: https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read our post “3 Back-to-School Strategies for Food Allergy Families.” Remember, Dr. Hoyt is an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          UPDATE! Stock Epinephrine and the Laws that Support It: Louisiana Edition https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/update-stock-epinephrine-and-the-laws-that-support-it-louisiana-edition/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 20:50:46 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=10737 Stock epinephrine is gaining in popularity in the Bayou State! As you may know from my earlier post, epinephrine is a medication that can stop and treat the life-threatening allergic reaction “anaphylaxis.” Young children may have their first allergic reaction at their early childcare center. This is why it is critical that center staff know how to prevent, recognize, and respond to anaphylaxis. This training includes how and when to use epinephrine on a kiddo who may not have previously had an allergic reaction or food allergy diagnosis. That's where stock epinephrine laws come in – they provide protections for centers to stock this medication and help keep kids safe.

          So what exactly is stock epinephrine?

          As in my earlier post…

          “In short, its epinephrine prescribed to an entity, such as a school, to be used in an allergy emergency. The medication is typically stored in an easily accessible location, such as a nurse's office or main office, and can be administered by trained personnel. Epinephrine, when administered from an auto-injector like an EpiPen, is incredibly safe. In fact, it's so safe that states across the country have adopted legislation that supports or sometimes even requires schools to stock epinephrine.”

          Alice Hoyt, MD

          But do all states permit early childcare centers to stock epinephrine? No. And are center staff required to know how to prevent recognize, and respond to anaphylaxis? No.

          But now Louisiana does both!

          The Bayou State is Protecting its Babies!

          To help protect all infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, Rep. Stephanie Hilferty sponsored Louisiana HB417. I was honored to work with Rep. Hilferty and her team in crafting this legislation. I then testified to the Louisiana House of Representatives Education Committee in support of this legislation. As expected, the legislation passed through committee and was passed into law without any nay votes! This law requires all licensed childcare centers in Louisiana to have at least one staff members trained on how to prevent, recognize, and respond to anaphylaxis. Plus, it permits centers to stock epinephrine and provides legal protections for them to do so. Read the law.

          Dr. Alice Hoyt and Rep. Stephanie Hilferty discuss with the media why stock epinephrine legislation for early childhood centers is critical.
          Dr. Alice Hoyt and Rep. Stephanie Hilferty discuss with the media at the Louisiana State Capitol why stock epinephrine legislation for early childhood centers is critical.

          Do you want to advocate for stock epinephrine in your state?

          If you are interested in stock epinephrine legislation in your state, please visit the Code Ana website. You can learn more about the current state of stock epinephrine. Code Ana is a national program supported by The Teal Schoolhouse. This nonprofit organization works on behalf of families with children with food allergies and other medical conditions. Let's work together to make our kiddos as safe as possible. Teamwork makes the dream work!

          Dr. Alice Hoyt and Rep. Stephanie Hilferty advocate for stock epinephrine legislation for early childhood centers.
          Dr. Alice Hoyt and Rep. Stephanie Hilferty advocate for stock epinephrine legislation for early childhood centers.

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Top 3 Tips for an Awesome Summer with Food Allergies https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/top-3-tips-for-an-awesome-summer-with-food-allergies/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 11:29:31 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=7605 Summertime is a time for fun in the sun, but for families managing food allergies, summer can also be a time of anxiety. Camping, road trips, and days at the beach all present their own sets of challenges when you have to worry about what foods are safe to eat. Plus, back-to-school will arrive sooner than you think! But don't worry – you've got this! We've got your back with our top three tips for having an awesome summer with food allergies.

          Tip #1: Collect your kiddo's epinephrine and any other meds from your kiddo's school nurse.

          This is super important so that:

          1. You don't lose that epi. It's pricey!
          2. You can use it for summer activities!

          This is also a great time to reassess how your kiddo is doing regarding self-managing that auto-injector. It's important that children transition from the pediatric care model (in which parents are responsible for medical management) to the adult care model (in which the patient is responsible for medical management). As your kiddo wraps up another year at school, consider things like self-carrying epi, ordering at restaurants, and other things you may do for your kiddo and set age-appropriate goals for when your kiddo will be in charge of those things.

          Tip #2: Review the summer activities in which your kiddo will be participating and have very clear food allergy and anaphylaxis action plans.

          Don't assume that camps are off-limits due to a lack of food allergy preparedness. More and more camps are equipping themselves to prevent and manage medical emergencies. Likewise, don't assume that just because another kiddo with food allergy attends a camp, that it's safe. Always do your due diligence, and only send your kiddo if the camp meets all your expectations.

          food allergies summer

          Tip #3: Get a jump-start on the upcoming school year!

          This is especially important if your kiddo will be going to a new school. Stop by the school before the end of the current school year. You'll want to be sure you have all necessary forms and meds well prior to day one of the new school year.

          Bonus Tip: Have your kiddo's annual allergy appointment in July. This will allow your allergist to review any new treatments without you feeling the rush of getting youor kiddo back to class or to after-school activities. Also, this is the time to get school forms completed and med updated.

          Don't miss this episode of the podcast in which Pam and Dr. Hoyt discuss these tips and so much more!

          food allergies summer podcast

          Thanks for reading this post “Top 3 Tips for an Awesome Summer with Food Allergies.” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!

          food allergy testing ebook

          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “Top 3 Tips for an Awesome Summer with Food Allergies.” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          The Allergists Talk Oral Immunotherapy – OIT – for Food Allergies https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/the-allergists-talk-oral-immunotherapy-oit-for-food-allergies/ Tue, 31 May 2022 12:18:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=7446 Do you have a child with a food allergy? If so, you may be wondering about oral immunotherapy, OIT. OIT is a therapy that can help children (and adults) to tolerate foods that they are allergic to. In this episode of the Food Allergy and Your Kiddo podcast, Dr. Alice Hoyt interviews her colleague and fellow OIT allergist Dr. Hugh Windom. They discuss all things OIT!

          First things first: this episode has horrible sound quality, so Drs. Hoyt and Windom are planning to re-record soon. Be sure to submit your questions about OIT!

          So what is OIT?

          OIT is a treatment for IgE-mediated food allergies. OIT teaches the immune system to tolerate the allergen. The development of this tolerance happens over months to years.

          Is OIT a cure for food allergies?

          No. OIT does not erase the food allergy from the body. OIT teaches the body's immune tolerance to be stronger than the allergy.

          Is OIT for food allergies of all types?

          No. OIT is only for IgE-mediated food allergies.

          Is OIT available in my area?

          Check out this site to find an allergist offering OIT near you.

          Tune in to this episode to learn MUCH more about food allergies and OIT!

          Again, we are bummed about the sound quality, but the content is great. Hopefully it gets you thinking about questions we may not have answered! Send those questions our way!


          Thanks for reading this post “The Allergists Talk Oral Immunotherapy – OIT – for Food Allergies.” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!


          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “The Allergists Talk Oral Immunotherapy – OIT – for Food Allergies.” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          Seasonal allergies have met their match with Dr. Hoyt’s allergy regimen! https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/seasonal-allergies-have-met-their-match-with-dr-hoyts-allergy-regimen/ Tue, 24 May 2022 13:45:58 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=6846 The flowers are blooming, the sun is shining, and the trees are green. Yes, warmer weather has finally arrived! But for many people, this time of year also brings sneezing, congestion, and itchy eyes. That's because seasonal allergies have kicked in. If you're one of the millions of Americans who suffer from seasonal allergies, don't worry – you're not alone. And I've got some great news for you: there are treatments that can help make your life a lot more comfortable! Keep reading to learn more about Dr. Hoyt's own seasonal allergies treatment.

          What are seasonal allergies?

          First, let's start with a little bit of background. Seasonal allergies, also called allergic rhinitis or hay fever, are caused by pollen in the air. Pollen is a tiny particle that is released by trees, grasses, and weeds. When it enters your nose, it can trigger an allergic reaction in your nose! Symptoms include sneezing, congestion, runny nose, and itchy eyes. These symptoms develop because the allergy cells in your nose are being activated. Activated allergy cells release chemicals, like histamine, which cause those itchy-drippy-sneezy effects!

          Seasonal Allergies Treatment

          If you've ever tried to treat these symptoms, you have probably visited the allergy aisle. Yikes! So. Many. Options. You probably stand there thinking and staring:

          • What product or products do I really need?
          • How are all these different from each other?
          • These are pricey… which should I really get?
          seasonal allergies treatment
          Treatment for seasonal allergies can be confusing!

          It's great that there are options, but when you don't know what you need, it's hard to make informed decisions.

          Tune in to this episode of Dr. Hoyt's podcast where she shares her regimen to successfully treat seasonal allergies. Of course, this information is education and should not be considered medical advice. Take what you learn from this quick episode and ask your doctor what regimen may work for you!

          Learn about seasonal allergies treatment on this episode of the podcast!

          Thanks for reading this post “Seasonal allergies have met their match with Dr. Hoyt's regimen!” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!


          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “Seasonal allergies have met their match with Dr. Hoyt's regimen!” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          Allergy Versus Immune Tolerance https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-versus-immune-tolerance/ Sat, 21 May 2022 13:10:02 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=6703 In food allergy, the immune system is like a playground. The balance of allergy and immune tolerance is like a see-saw. Food allergy is not just the activation of allergy cells by a food. Food allergy is the lack of tolerance to a food. It’s important to understand allergy versus immune tolerance. Read on to learn how!

          This article was originally published in 2020 and has since been updated!

          immune tolerance
          Immune tolerance is a teeter-totter with food allergy.

          The Balance of Allergy and Tolerance

          When I think of allergy, I think of two parts of the immune system: allergy and tolerance. 

          The Immunology of Allergy

          Allergy is what you may think of as what should NOT be the body’s default response to a food. You would be right! An allergic response is one in which the immune system, whose purpose is to protect us from infection, senses the food is an evil-doer so attacks it. Why would the immune system get confused like this? Peanuts are not evil-doing infections, so why would our immune systems make such a mistake? Researchers are working hard to determine WHY kiddos are developing food allergies. 

          How an allergic reaction occur

          What we do know is that allergy cells become activated when a baby with a peanut allergy consumes peanut protein. The key allergy cells in allergic reactions are mast cells. In peanut allergy, mast cells are activated because they have peanut-specific allergy antibodies on their surfaces. The antibodies are also called peanut immunoglobulin E (IgE). Peanut IgE is like a lock on a door, and peanut protein is the specific key that opens that lock. Once the peanut “key” unlocks the mast cell “door,” the mast cells release chemicals. These chemicals, such as histamine, then cause the allergic reaction.

          Check out this video from the NIH on histamine! 

          The Immunology of Tolerance

          Tolerance is what you may think of as what should be the body’s default response to a food. Again, you would be right! When a baby is given a food for the first time, we expect the baby’s immune system will tolerate it. We do NOT expect an allergic reaction. Tolerance is a complex process involving multiple components of the immune system, and I won’t get into those nitty-gritty details. The result of tolerance is that a baby is able to eat the food without allergy cells being activated. Tolerance can occur even if a kiddo has allergic antibodies to the food.

          We’ve talked about allergy. We’ve talked about tolerance. So how do these two interact? And we can test for allergy, but how do we test for tolerance?

          The Interactivity of Allergy and Tolerance

          We (allergists) do not know why a kiddo develops a food allergy. What we do know is that early introduction and regular consumption of a food typically results in immune tolerance. We also tend to believe there is a critical window in which foods should be introduced. Such introduction encourages the development of tolerance and not allow allergy to take the stage. 

          Basically, a kiddo is either allergic to a food or immunologically tolerant of a food. Please note: this is specifically describing immune tolerance. This is different from a “food intolerance” like lactose intolerance, which is not related to the immune system.

          The Role of Allergy Testing

          If a kiddo is either allergic or tolerant of a food, how do we test for these?

          Allergy testing includes skin prick testing and blood testing. 

          Skin prick testing involves applying a small drop of an allergen-containing solution atop the skin. Then, a nurse uses a skin prick device to prick through the drop and into the skin. This exposes those mast cells to the allergen in question. If the mast cells have allergen-specific IgE on their surfaces, then the mast cell “unlocks.” The mast cell releases chemicals, such as histamine, at the site of the skin prick. This release of chemicals causes a red, raised, itchy bump and redness surrounding the bump – a wheal and flare, respectively. 

          Blood testing involves collecting a blood sample from the kiddo. The laboratory processes the blood, then a machine called ImmunoCAP detects allergen-specific IgE, such as peanut IgE. 

          Both skin and blood testing determine whether or not the kiddo has allergic antibodies, but neither skin nor blood testing tell us much about the kiddo’s tolerance to the food. So, ultimately, neither skin testing nor blood testing tell us whether or not a kiddo is allergic to a food. What skin and blood testing do is inform an allergist’s clinical decision making.

          To learn more about food allergy testing, check out Dr. Hoyt's ebook!
          To learn more about food allergy testing, check out Dr. Hoyt's ebook!

          Testing for Tolerance… and Allergy

          Unfortunately, the only test currently available for tolerance is the ingestion challenge. An ingestion challenge is a procedure performed at an allergist’s office. The procedure lasts a few hours and involves the kiddo sequentially ingesting an increasing amount of the food in question. The “goal dose” of the food is typically an average serving size for the kiddo’s age. Allergists use clinical history and prior testing (skin and/or blood) to approximate the risk of the kiddo having a reaction. When a kiddo has a reaction, the ingestion challenge is deemed “positive,” and food allergy is confirmed. When a kiddo does not have a reaction, the ingestion challenge is deemed negative,” and allergy is ruled out. This means tolerance is confirmed.


          Thanks for reading this post “Food Allergy: Understanding Allergy Versus Immune Tolerance.” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!


          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “Food Allergy: Understanding Allergy Versus Immune Tolerance.” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          Celiac Disease: What It Is and Isn’t and What To Do About It https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/celiac-disease-what-it-is-and-isnt-and-what-to-do-about-it/ Sat, 14 May 2022 11:05:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=6164 Celiac Disease: What It Is and Isn’t and What To Do About It Read More »

          ]]>
          Celiac disease is a condition that affects millions of people all over the world. Still, it often is misunderstood. Celiac Disease is not a “wheat allergy” or a “gluten sensitivity.” Celiac Disease is an inappropriate immune response to gluten. If left untreated, it can have serious consequences. In this article, we will break discuss:

          • What Celiac Disease really is,
          • How it differs from wheat allergy and gluten sensitivity, and
          • What to do if you suspect your child has it.

          What is Celiac Disease?

          Celiac Disease is an immune condition triggered by gluten. This disease occurs in genetically-susceptible individuals. Gluten is a protein found in some grains. Examples of gluten-containing grains include:

          • Wheat
          • Rye
          • Barley
          • Triticale

          When someone with Celiac Disease eats a gluten-containing food, the immune system responds. This response damages the lining of the small intestine. The exact mechanism through which this occurs is complex. It involves cells that line the GI tract and immune cells that interact with the GI tract. The response involves the following steps:

          1. Gluten is taken up into certain cells of the GI tract.
          2. Immune cells recognize the gluten within those cells as dangerous so wage an attack.
          3. The GI tract cells are damaged by the immune cells' attacks toward gluten.
          celiac disease
          Celiac Disease damages gut villi, impairing the absorption of important nutrients and causing GI symptoms.

          From this description, you can tell that this immune response is very different from the immune responses we've discussed in food allergy articles. The main difference is that IgE is really not at all involved. In fact, completely different immunoglobulins are present in people with Celiac Disease. You can read more about those.

          Symptoms of Celiac Disease commonly include:

          • Abdominal pain
          • Bloating
          • Diarrhea
          • Fatigue
          • Other symptoms are detailed nicely on Celiac.org

          Treatment for Celiac Disease includes strict gluten avoidance. It's important to follow closely with a gastroenterologist if you or your child has Celiac Disease. If you suspect Celiac Disease, talk with your physician.

          What is Wheat Allergy?

          In contrast to Celiac Disease, wheat allergy is a food allergy most mediated by IgE. We talk a lot about IgE-mediated food allergies in this earlier post. Wheat also plays a role in non-IgE-mediated food allergies and in mixed IgE-and-non-IgE-mediated food allergies. Wheat can be involved in:

          Gluten is not the same thing as wheat. Wheat is a grain, and it contains the protein gluten. Wheat protein is the allergen in wheat allergy. Because wheat protein is structurally different from gluten protein, the two are not interchangeable. This is why many patients with wheat allergy can actually eat barley and rye, amongst other grains, without having an allergic reaction. It's because barley and rye proteins are structurally different from wheat protein.

          It's important to differentiate between wheat allergy and Celiac Disease. That's because the treatments for these disorders are different. For wheat allergy, wheat avoidance is the most common treatment. If IgE-mediated wheat allergy is present, oral immunotherapy can be considered. Accidental ingestions with wheat allergy can cause life-threatening anaphylaxis, and the treatment for anaphylaxis is epinephrine.

          What is Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity?

          Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a real condition, but it is different from Celiac Disease. NCGS does not involve the immune system in the same way that Celiac Disease does. Patients with NCGS may have symptoms that are similar to patients with Celiac Disease, such as:

          • Abdominal pain
          • Bloating
          • Diarrhea
          • Fatigue

          The immune response in NCGS is different than that in Celiac Disease and in wheat allergy. For a deep dive on that response, check out this article from the academic journal Gastroenterology. Here's an overview of it.

          NCGS is treated with gluten avoidance, and it is important to follow with a physician who's familiar with this condition.

          What To Do If You Suspect Celiac Disease or Another Gluten-Associated Problem

          It's critical to see a physician who is familiar with these disorders and for you to be heard. Science has come a long way in helping us understand how our bodies interact with foods. That said, there is still so much we don't know. Talk with your or your kiddo's allergist or gastroenterologist about your concerns. And, of course, don't stop advocating for your family. You've got this!

          Celiac disease happy kids
          Children with Celiac Disease and other food issues can have happy, healthy lives.

          Thanks for reading this post “Celiac Disease: What It Is and Isn't and What To Do About It.” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!


          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “Celiac Disease: What It Is and Isn't and What To Do About It.” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          Do food allergies cause eczema? Here are the facts! https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/do-food-allergies-cause-eczema-here-are-the-facts/ Fri, 13 May 2022 15:03:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=6156 Do food allergies cause eczema? Here are the facts! Read More »

          ]]>
          Food allergies are a hot topic right now. There seems to be a new food allergy every day, and many people are wondering if food allergies cause eczema. The answer is no – food allergies do not cause eczema. However, atopic dermatitis (eczema) is a risk factor for developing food allergies. In this blog post, we will discuss the relationship between food allergies and eczema. We will also look at how food-induced flaring of atopic dermatitis can occur in some children.

          food allergies and eczema

          What is eczema?

          Eczema is a chronic inflammatory skin condition. It affects millions of people worldwide, including children. Eczema is characterized by dry, itchy skin that can sometimes lead to skin infections. Atopic dermatitis is the most common type of eczema. “Atopic” means allergic. “Dermat” means skin. And “itis” means inflammation of. So atopic dermatitis is allergic inflammation of the skin. This means that the allergy components of the immune system are involved in this complex skin condition.

          Most children with eczema have atopic dermatitis. Read about other forms of eczema here. For the purposes of this article, we will use eczema and atopic dermatitis interchangeably.

          food allergies and eczema

          What are food allergies?

          Food allergies are inappropriate immune responses to foods. Different types of food allergies cause different types of symptoms. The symptoms are typically determined by whether mast cells and IgE play a role in the food allergy. Food allergies can be characterized by whether IgE is involved:

          • IgE-Mediated Food Allergy
          • Non-IgE-Mediated Food Allergy
          • Mixed IgE- and Non-IgE-Mediated Food Allergy

          How are eczema and food allergies related?

          Eczema is a risk factor for developing food allergies.

          In other words, people with eczema are more likely to develop food allergies than people without eczema. This is especially true for children, especially babies, with eczema.

          Perhaps the most well-known research regarding food allergies and eczema was the LEAP Study. This and its follow up study LEAP On considered children to be at high risk of developing peanut allergy if they had severe eczema or egg allergy. This risk association had previously been identified in 2013. Read more about these on this prior post.

          We do not know why eczema predisposes babies to developing food allergies. The thought is that the inflammation of the skin caused by eczema creates an allergic immune environment. This may happen because the skin is the immune organ that helps protect against parasite infections, and much of the same immune machinery used to prevent parasite infections is actually used in allergic reactions. If you want a deep dive on atopic dermatitis and inflammation, check out this video abstract by Dr. Lisa Beck and the video below.

          Dr. Lisa Beck discusses treatment for moderate to severe eczema in children and adults.

          Foods do not cause eczema.

          When it comes to eczema, there are many myths and misconceptions. One of the most common misconceptions is that foods cause eczema. Food allergies do not cause eczema.

          That said, some children and adults experience food-induced flaring of atopic dermatitis. What does this mean? This means that, upon ingesting a food, the baby's eczema may flare a few hours later or the next day. Many times, these children have positive skin and/or blood tests to that food. That does not mean, however, that they are necessarily allergic to the food (not allergic yet, at least!). Here's why.

          We discussed that eczema increases allergic inflammation and seems to promote allergy on a cellular, immune level. This means that many people with eczema are likely to develop IgE to lots of things: foods, pollens, etc. But just because someone has IgE to a food does not mean they are allergic.

          Positive skin or blood test WITHOUT known history of allergic reaction = the patient is SENSITIZED.

          Positive skin or blood test WITH known history of allergic reaction = the patient is ALLERGIC.

          Allergy skin and blood tests are testing for the presence of IgE. These tests do not test for the amount of tolerance a person has to a food. Tolerance is made through a type of T cell. Currently, the only way to determine if someone is allergic to a food is through a food challenge, which should only be performed by a trained allergist. Read more about allergy testing in Dr. Hoyt's ebook all about allergy testing.

          So what do you do about food-induced flaring of eczema?

          It's important to see an allergist if your child has eczema, especially if you think some foods are flaring the eczema. The allergist will discuss in detail your child's history and symptoms. Skin and/or blood testing may be performed. The intention of this evaluation should be to develop a strategy to safely keep or get the food in the child's diet while improving the skin. It's important to keep foods in a kiddo's diet when at all possible so that tolerance to the food can grow. Prolonged avoidance of foods may result in allergy as was the case in the LEAP study.

          Of course, if your child has had any reaction to a food, see an allergist immediately to determine next steps, and have your child avoid the food until it is determined by the doctor to be safe.

          Food allergy is complicated, as is eczema. Through shared decision-making with a good allergist, these to conditions can be well managed and your kiddo and family can lead a happy, heathy life!

          food allergies do not cause eczema
          Allergists can be very helpful in managing eczema.

          Thanks for reading this post “Do food allergies cause eczema? Here are the facts!” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!

          food allergy testing ebook

          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “Do food allergies cause eczema? Here are the facts!” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          What is EOE and what role does IgE play in this food allergy? https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/what-is-eoe-and-what-role-does-ige-play-in-this-food-allergy/ Thu, 12 May 2022 11:45:08 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=6133 What is EOE and what role does IgE play in this food allergy? Read More »

          ]]>
          Has your kiddo been diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis, also called EOE? If so, then you may be wondering what this really means. EOE is a food allergy disorder that causes inflammation of the esophagus. An eosinophil is a type of allergy cell, and the esophagus is the swallowing tube that connects the mouth to the stomach. Eosinophils are not normally found in the esophagus, so if they are present, EOE may be at play. While the underlying cause of this food allergy is still unclear, it is known that some foods can trigger this inflammation. In this post, we will discuss all things EOE: from symptoms to treatment options.

          EOE is a food allergy that affects the esophagus.
          EOE is a food allergy that affects the esophagus.

          Who has EOE?

          EOE is actually more common than you might think. The exact prevalence is unknown but is thought to be somewhere around 05.-1 cases/1000 persons. This food allergy affects both children and adults. Boys are affected more often than girls, and EOE usually develops in early childhood or adolescence. However, this food allergy can develop at any age.

          What causes EOE?

          The exact cause of EOE is unknown. However, it is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors (also called epigenetics). There are some theories out there about what might trigger this food allergy condition, but nothing has been proven yet. Some possible triggers include:

          • An abnormal immune response to certain foods
          • Certain medications or medical conditions
          • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
          • Allergies to airborne substances such as pollen or pet dander

          EOE is often considered a “mixed IgE-and-non-IgE-mediated food allergy” because IgE may be present and may play some role. That said, this food allergy does not seem to be reliant to IgE for the condition to be present. It's unclear what role IgE plays in EOE.

          If your kiddo has EOE so is avoiding milk, there are safe, yummy food options available in many grocery stores and restaurants.
          If your kiddo has EOE so is avoiding milk, there are safe, yummy food options available in many grocery stores.

          What are the symptoms of EOE?

          The most common symptom of EOE is trouble swallowing. This may appear in a kiddo as having to drink a lot with eating. It may result in avoiding foods that are hard to swallow. Food can sometimes actually get stuck in the esophagus. Other symptoms may include:

          • Heartburn
          • Chest discomfort
          • Abdominal pain
          • Nausea
          • Vomiting
          • Weight loss
          • Fatigue

          If you or your child is experiencing any of these symptoms, it's important to see a doctor.

          How is EOE diagnosed?

          EOE is diagnosed through a procedure called an EGD: esophagogastroduodenoscopy. This procedure involves having the child sedated then using a small camera to look at the esophagus. The camera geos thrugh the mouth, down the esophagus into the stomach, and can even peak into the first part of the small intestine. In addition to visualizing the areas, tiny biopsies can be taken. In EOE, biopsies are taken in multiple locations of this upper GI track. The kiddo then is gently awoken from sedation. Meanwhile, those biopsies are then sent to the laboratory, where they are examined under the microscope. If there are eosinophils in the biopsies, then EOE may be at play.

          What is the treatment for EOE?

          The good news is that EOE is treatable! One common treatment option is dietary modification, which involves avoiding trigger foods. This can be challenging as there is no test to determine which food is a trigger. Milk is a common trigger food for many kiddos and adults with EOE. Trigger foods may include:

          • Milk
          • Wheat
          • Egg
          • Soy and other legumes
          • Peanuts
          • Tree nuts
          • Fish
          • Shellfish

          Another treatment is medication, which can help reduce the inflammation in the esophagus. If you or your kiddo has EOE, it's important to work with a doctor to find a treatment plan that works for you.

          You've got this!

          EOE can be a difficult condition, but with the right diagnosis and treatment plan, it is possible to live a normal, fantastic life. If you or your kiddo has EOE, the most important thing is to seek medical help from an allergist who is familiar with EOE and create a plan that works for your kiddo.

          Families can still lead happy, wonderful lives while managing EOE.
          Families can still lead happy, wonderful lives while managing EOE.

          Thanks for reading this post “What is EOE and what role does IgE play in this food allergy?” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!

          food allergy testing ebook

          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “What is EOE and what role does IgE play in this food allergy?” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          What are non-IgE-mediated food allergies, like FPIES and FPIAP? https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/what-are-non-ige-mediated-food-allergies-like-fpies-and-fpiap/ Wed, 11 May 2022 18:35:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=6021 What are non-IgE-mediated food allergies, like FPIES and FPIAP? Read More »

          ]]>
          Do you know what non-IgE-mediated food allergies are? If not, you're not alone. Many people have never heard of food allergies that are not mediated by IgE. Examples include FPIES, FPE, and FPIAP. These types of food allergies are different from the more-common IgE-mediated food allergies. In this article, we will describe non-IgE-mediated food allergies in detail. We also will explain the difference between those and IgE-mediated food allergies.

          Don't miss this awesome podcast episode featuring Dr. Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn!

          What is IgE?

          Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a type of antibody. Normally, antibodies are produced by the immune system to protect the body from foreign substances, such as bacteria and viruses. IgE is thought to play a role in protecting us from parasite infections. It is different from other types of antibodies because it is involved in allergic reactions.

          IgE-mediated allergic reactions occur when someone has allergen-specific IgE on their mast cells. When that person ingests his or her allergen, an allergic reaction occurs. For example, if Sweet Pea has peanut IgE on her mast cells and ingests peanut butter, then she can have an allergic reaction. What prevents someone with peanut IgE from having an allergic reaction to peanut is what's called tolerance. Read more about tolerance.

          Not all allergic reactions involve IgE. These are called non-IgE-mediated food allergies, such as:

          1. Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES),
          2. Food protein-induced allergic proctocolitis (FPIAP),
          3. Food-protein enteropathy (FPE), and
          4. Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGIDs), such as eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE)*

          *Since there seems to be some role of IgE in EOE, we will discuss EOE and EGIDs in a different article.

          Non-IgE-mediated food allergies are caused by a reaction in the gastrointestinal tract. The symptoms can vary depending on the person. Often, symptoms can include:

          • Vomiting,
          • Diarrhea,
          • Abdominal pain, and
          • Blood in the stool.

          Non-IgE-mediated food allergies can be severe and even life-threatening. In rare cases, they chronically involve the lungs, such as in Heiner's Syndrome. Read more on this cow's milk-induced pulmonary disorder here.

          Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

          FPIES is a non-IgE-mediated food allergy. It affects the gastrointestinal tract. FPIES typically presents in infancy or early childhood. That said, it can occur in adults. Any food protein can trigger FPIES. The most common triggers are cow's milk and soy. Other trigger foods include grains, legumes, meat, and fish.

          Oats are a common trigger food of FPIES.
          Oats are a common trigger food of FPIES.

          Symptoms of “acute” FPIES reaction can include vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, low blood pressure, and even shock. These acute symptoms occur within a few hours.

          Some patients have “chronic” FPIES. This presents more often in the first weeks to months of life. Chronic FPIES can cause severe failure-to-thrive associated with its gastrointestinal symptoms.

          How is FPIES diagnosed?

          FPIES is diagnosed clinically, meaning there is not a test for it. The allergist will talk with the patient's family to help determine the trigger food.

          How is FPIES treated?

          FPIES is treated by avoiding the trigger food(s). It typically resolves within a year.

          Don’t miss this fantastic FPIES discussion between Dr. Hoyt and world-renown FPIES expert Dr. Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn.

          Food Protein-Induced Allergic Proctocolitis (FPIAP)

          FPIAP is a self-limiting food allergy of infancy. It presents with blood-streaked and/or mucus-containing stools. FPIAP occurs in breast-fed babies more so than formula-fed babies. This means that sometimes mom may be eating a food that is triggering this condition.

          How is FPIAP diagnosed?

          FPIAP is diagnosed clinically. Like FPIES, there is no test for it.

          How is FPIAP treated?

          Also like FPIES, the allergist will talk with mom about potential trigger foods, such as cow's milk products.

          FPIAP is a non-IgE-mediated food allergy. The symptoms in baby are sometimes helped by mom avoiding cow's milk products in her diet.
          FPIAP is a non-IgE-mediated food allergy. The symptoms in baby are sometimes helped by mom avoiding cow's milk products in her diet.

          FPIAP is treated a few ways. The mom can try avoiding trigger foods in her own diet. Also, a trial of extensively hydrolyzed formula may be tried. This condition typically resolves before the baby's first birthday.

          Food-Protein Enteropathy (FPE)

          FPE is a very rare non-IgE-mediated disorder. Symptoms include non-bloody, protracted diarrhea. This occurs within the first nine months of life, but symptoms often begin within the first eight weeks of life. Onset of symptoms may coincide with the introduction of cow's milk products. Soy, wheat, and egg may also be triggers. This disorder can cause abdominal pain, malabsorption, and failure to thrive.

          How is FPE diagnosed?

          FPE is diagnosed with a biopsy of the small intestine. Fortunately, this condition is incredibly rare these days.

          How is FPE treated?

          It is treated with avoidance of the trigger food. When It typically resolves within 24-36 months.

          FPE is a very rare non-IgE-mediated food allergy. When it is present, it typically resolves by age 3 years.
          FPE is a very rare non-IgE-mediated food allergy. When it is present, it typically resolves by age 3 years.

          Non-IgE-Mediated Food Allergies are Important!

          Non-IgE-mediated food allergies are important to be aware of. They present differently than IgE-mediated allergies but can cause severe reactions and even be life-threatening. If you think your child may have a non-IgE-mediated allergy, speak with your allergist.


          Thanks for reading this post “What are non-IgE-mediated food allergies, like FPIES?” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!

          food allergy testing ebook

          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “What are non-IgE-mediated food allergies, like FPIES?” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          What are IgE-mediated, life-threatening food allergies? https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/what-are-ige-mediated-life-threatening-food-allergies/ Tue, 10 May 2022 17:39:26 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=6002 What are IgE-mediated, life-threatening food allergies? Read More »

          ]]>
          Did you know that food allergies can be life-threatening? It's true. In fact, anaphylaxis is a life-threatening allergic reaction that can occur when someone eats a food to which they are allergic. In most cases, the type of food allergy that is life-threatening is IgE-mediated food allergy. In this article, we will discuss IgE-mediated food allergy and why it can be so very concerning.

          So what is IgE? And what's its role in life-threatening food allergies?

          IgE is a molecule found on the outsides of allergy cells, specifically mast cells. IgE binds to allergens. It’s a lot like a lock on the door of your house. Only a specific key fits the lock. That lock-and-key that then allows the door to be unlocked and opened. In, for example, a little girl with peanut allergy, she has mast cells that have peanut-specific IgE on them. Much like the lock on a door, only a specific key can unlock that cell – in this case, peanut protein. 

          What happens when IgE activates an allergy cell?

          When peanut binds to peanut-specific IgE, that binding signals for the release chemical-filled granules. This process is called “degranulation.” 

          IgE-mediated life threatening food allergy reactions involve mast cells, IgE, and the food allergen.
          IgE-mediated life threatening food allergy reactions involve mast cells, IgE, and the food allergen.

          When the mast cell degranulates, the chemicals inside the granules are released into the surrounding tissues and blood stream. Those chemicals, such as histamine (itching!) and vasodilators (swelling and drop in blood pressure!) and bronchoconstrictors (trouble breathing!) and other chemicals are deposited locally. This means that, in the case of someone with food allergy ingesting their allergen, chemicals are released from granules into the stomach, causing nausea and vomiting. This reaction can also spread throughout the body. This can result in hives, swelling, trouble breathing, and drop in blood pressure, among other symptoms. 

          Non-IgE-Mediated, Severe Food Allergies

          Just because a child has a non-IgE-mediated food allergy does not mean their food allergy should be taken any less seriously. One example of a non-anaphylactic but severe food allergy is food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES). More on FPIES here.

          “But my kiddo has only ever had hives from his food allergy. Does he have a life-threatening food allergy?”

          Hives one times does not mean hives the next time. Having hives as a manifestation of IgE-mediated food allergy reaction – meaning your kiddo ate a food and quickly developed hives on his body beyond where the peanut butter touched his skin (so he got hives all over but on touched peanut butter on his fingers) means there is a system-wide response to that peanut butter occurring. Thankfully, only hives resulted (no disrespect to hives – soooo itchy – but better than life-threatening symptoms!). This reaction suggests he has IgE-mediated peanut allergy and should avoid peanut and carry an epinephrine auto-injector to treat anaphylaxis.

          What is the treatment for IgE-mediated, life-threatening food allergies?

          Epinephrine is the treatment for an IgE-mediated severe allergic reaction, also called anaphylaxis. Epinephrine is the medication that not only stops the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis but also shuts down the allergy cells that are causing the reaction. More on epinephrine here.

          Immunotherapy, such as oral immunotherapy (OIT), can be considered as a treatment to build a person’s tolerance to an allergenic food. While it can be very helpful in making the immune system less sensitive to the food allergen, it carries its own risks. Check learn more below:

          See an allergist about life-threatening food allergies.

          As more and more children (and adults) are managing food allergies, it's important that everyone with a food allergy see a board-certified allergist. The allergist can determine what type of food allergy is present and provide best treatment options.


          Thanks for reading this post “What are life-threatening food allergies?” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!

          food allergy testing ebook

          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “What are life-threatening food allergies?” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          The Superdome turned teal for Food Allergy Awareness Week! https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/the-superdome-turned-teal-for-food-allergy-awareness-week/ Mon, 09 May 2022 14:58:25 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=5932 The Superdome turned teal for Food Allergy Awareness Week! Read More »

          ]]>
          To kick off Food Allergy Awareness Week, the New Orleans Superdome turned teal! New Orleans has one of the best, most diverse food scenes in the world, and the Superdome is one of the largest and most well-known stadiums in the world. So what a great way to start this important week! Special thanks to Code Ana for requesting the Superdome turn teal, and special thanks to Caesar's Superdome for turning it teal!

          What is Food Allergy Awareness Week, and why was the Superdome turned teal?

          Food Allergy Awareness Week is a weeklong event held every May to raise awareness of food allergies. This year, it runs from May 8-14, and we kicked it off by turning the New Orleans Superdome teal! Teal is the color of allergy awareness! The goal of the week is to educate as many people as possible about food allergies and how to prevent and treat them. Food Allergy Awareness Week is part of the Allergy and Asthma Awareness Month, which is May. Some people use this entire month to focus on food allergy awareness!

          The New Orleans Superdome turned teal for Food Allergy Awareness Week!
          The New Orleans Superdome turned teal for Food Allergy Awareness Week!

          What is Food Allergy?

          A food allergy is an inappropriate immune response to a food. In someone with a food allergy, their body's immune system sees the food as harmful, so the immune system attacks it. In many cases, even a tiny amount of the food can trigger an allergic reaction.

          There are many types of food allergy conditions. The different types can be divided into the following:

          • IgE-Mediated Food Allergy
          • Non-IgE-Mediated Food Allergy
          • Mixed IgE- and Non-IgE-Mediated Food Allergy
          Different types of food allergies
          Food allergy conditions can be characterized by the role of IgE.

          Different food allergy conditions can have different triggers and different reactions. The different condition also have different therapies. If you or someone you know has a food allergy, it's important to know how to prevent and treat a reaction.

          “How can I advocate for increased awareness of food allergies?”

          There are a number of ways you can help advocate for increased awareness of food allergies:

          1. Educate yourself and others about food allergies and how to prevent and treat them.
          2. Show kindness and compassion to those managing these conditions, especially to parents of children with food allergy.
          3. Support organizations that are working to increase awareness, such as Code Ana.
          4. Wear teal and encourage others to wear teal to show support of food allergy awareness! And have event centers light up teal like the New Orleans Superdome turned teal!

          You can play an important role in raising awareness of food allergy. Learn more about food allergies this week by following Dr. Hoyt on social media. You'll see her daily food allergy fact during Food Allergy Awareness Week!


          Thanks for reading this post “The New Orleans Superdome turned teal for Food Allergy Awareness Week!” Do you have any questions about food allergies? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about all things food allergy. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!


          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:

          AAAAI Allergist Finder: https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist


          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!


          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “The New Orleans Superdome turned teal for Food Allergy Awareness Week!” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          Can allergies cause swollen lymph nodes? Here’s the answer! https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/can-allergies-cause-swollen-lymph-nodes-heres-the-answer/ Mon, 02 May 2022 10:51:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=5593 Can allergies cause swollen lymph nodes? Here’s the answer! Read More »

          ]]>
          Does your kiddo ever have swollen lymph nodes? Do you wonder if food allergies or seasonal allergies or pet allergies are to blame? If so, you're not alone. This is a common question that many parents consider, especially during the spring when allergies can be at their worst. In this post, we will answer that question and provide some information about what can cause swollen glands. Keep reading to learn more!

          Doctors can examine the lymph nodes in your child's neck by gently feeling her neck.
          Doctors can examine the lymph nodes in your child's neck by gently feeling her neck.

          What is a lymph node?

          Before we can answer the question, “Can allergies cause swollen lymph nodes?”, it's important to understand what a lymph node is. Lymph nodes, also called “glands,” are small, round structures that are found throughout the body. They are like the police stations of immune cells: immune cells monitor the lymph fluid for signs trouble – typically infection. Those cells then go and attack as needed to protect the body.

          Here's an overview of the lymphatic system!

          What causes swollen lymph nodes?

          There are a number of things that can cause swollen lymph nodes. The most common cause is an infection, such as a viral infection. When immune cells recognize infection, they become activated to fight that infection. That activation can cause the lymph nodes to enlarge and become tender. As the immune system fights off the infection, the lymph nodes go back to normal size. There are some less common causes of lymph node enlargement, so it's always important to talk with your kiddo's doctor. Your doctor likely will examine your child and ask questions about how long they've been enlarged, then go from there.

          Do allergies cause lymph nodes to swell?

          Allergies don't cause swollen lymph nodes. This can be an important symptom to clarify because swollen glands are often associated with infection, such as a upper respiratory virus. Seasonal allergies, pet allergies, and dust allergies can cause runny nose, congestion, and sneezing, just like infections. That said, these allergies don't cause swollen lymph nodes or fever, but infections can cause those symptoms.

          Food allergies also do not cause swollen lymph nodes. Lymph nodes do not enlarge in people with food allergies who are avoiding their allergens, and swollen lymph nodes are not a sign of an allergic reaction. Sometimes, people are concerned that milk increases mucus production, which then families may attribute to causing a cold. Milk actually has not been shown to cause increased mucus production and is not associated with upper respiratory infections, so it also is not a cause of lymph node swelling.

          Can allergies cause swollen lymph nodes?
          Cat dander allergies can cause sneezing and congestion but not swollen lymph nodes.

          “What should I do if my child has swollen lymph nodes?”

          If your child has swollen lymph nodes, it's important to talk with their healthcare provider. He or she can determine the cause and provide guidance on next steps, which may be monitoring. In most cases, swollen lymph nodes are not cause for concern and will go away on their own as the body fights off infection. Yay, immune system taking care of your kiddo!

          Thanks for reading!

          Thanks for reading this post “Can allergies cause swollen lymph nodes? Seasonal allergy symptoms explained.” Do you have any questions about allergies – food or otherwise!? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about food allergies or food allergy skin or blood testing. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Food allergy testing can be super confusing, so I've created this awesome ebook to clarify the facts from the fiction! Get your copy today!

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!

          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “Can allergies cause swollen lymph nodes? Seasonal allergy symptoms explained.” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          The Mamma’s Guide to Food Allergy Skin & Blood Testing https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/the-mammas-guide-to-food-allergy-skin-blood-testing/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=5366 If you're the parent of a child with a food allergy, then you know that food allergy skin and blood testing can be confusing. What do all those numbers and letters mean? What do they test for? And most importantly, what do they tell us about our child's risk of an allergic reaction? I wrote this ebook to educate parents on food allergy testing. In it, I explain skin prick testing, blood testing, and ingestion challenges. I also dispel some common myths about food allergy testing.

          food allergy ebook
          So much information! So simply explained!

          Here are a couple excerpts!

          From Chapter 2. What is Food Allergy Skin Testing?

          The Interpretation of Skin Prick Testing

          While application of the testing and reading/measuring of the testing is important, it is the interpretation of the SPT that is also critically important.

          • A food allergy SPT should only be performed if the allergist suspects the patient has an IgE-mediated food allergy.
          • SPT should be used to help support the allergist’s diagnosis and to help inform the allergist’s risk-stratification of the patient actually having food allergy.
          • A positive SPT does not necessarily mean the patient is allergic.
          • More on all this later!

          From Chapter 3. What is Food Allergy Blood Testing?

          How the Blood is Tested

          Allergy blood testing conducted using an ImmunoCAP machine.

          • Blood is collected, and that sample is allowed to clot.
          • The serum from the sample is easily collected from the tube and used in the testing as the sample.
            • Serum is the blood fluid that lacks cells and clotting factors. Serum contains other substances found in the blood, such as antibodies, electrolytes, and hormones.
          • The serum is loaded into the ImmunoCAP machine.
          • The ImmunoCAP machine uses special chemicals to detect specific IgE, such as peanut-specific IgE or egg-specific IgE.
          • The machine provides a measurement of how much specific IgE is detected.
          How Food Allergy Blood Testing Works
          How Food Allergy Blood Testing Works

          Happy reading!

          Thanks for reading this post, and I hope you enjoy the ebook! Do you have any questions about food allergies or food allergy skin or blood testing? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about food allergies or food allergy skin or blood testing. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          P.S. Don't forget to get the ebook today!

          food allergy testing ebook

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Do you have food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!

          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “The Food Allergy Mamma's Guide to Food Allergy Skin & Blood Testing: What It All Really Means!” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          Are Ring Pops Gluten-Free? How to Determine if Snacks are Safe! https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/are-ring-pops-gluten-free-how-to-determine-if-snacks-are-safe/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 11:15:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=5329 Are Ring Pops Gluten-Free? How to Determine if Snacks are Safe! Read More »

          ]]>
          Have you ever wondered if Ring Pops are gluten-free? Or maybe you've wondered if Saf-T-Pops are indeed safe for your kiddo with peanut allergy? When it comes to determining whether a food is safe for someone with a food allergy, food intolerance, or specific diet, there are three steps to success.

          are ring pops gluten-free
          Are Ring Pops gluten-free?

          Step 1. Know what you need to avoid.

          First, you need to know what ingredients or foods you need to avoid. For example, if you have Celiac or non-Celiac gluten sensitivity, then you will need to avoid gluten. Gluten can be found in wheat, rye, barley, and some other grains.

          Or, if you have a peanut allergy, you will want to avoid anything with peanuts or peanut products in it. Likewise, if you have lactose intolerance, you will want to avoid many milk-containing. This seems simple, but given the multiple names of some ingredients, knowing how to avoid certain ingredients can be challenging. Check out this great resource from FARE entitled Tips for Avoiding Your Allergen.

          In some cases, you may not know what you need to avoid. Many people are concerned they have food allergies. In fact, nearly 1 in 5 adults believe they have at least one “food allergy.” While half of those adults meet criteria for having a food allergy, that means that the other half – so a total of nearly 10% of adults in the US – have some sort of adverse reaction or sensitivity to one or more foods! If this is you: it's tempting to go online and order some sort of test that claims to help you figure out what's going on, but I have a better suggestion that I'll write about in Step #3 (SPOILER ALERT! See an allergist!)

          Ultimately, you probably don't need to know if Ring Pops are gluten-free unless you are trying to avoid gluten. That said, the first step in being able to avoid any food is knowing what food it is that you need to avoid!

          Step 2. Read the “Nutrition Facts” label to look for your problem ingredients.

          Second, read the label for the ingredients. All food labels in the United States are required by law to list the products ingredients. This list is found in the “Nutrition Facts” label, underneath the table. Allergens that currently need to be listed include:

          • Peanut
          • Tree nuts
          • Egg
          • Cow's milk
          • Wheat
          • Soy
          • Fish
          • Crustacean shellfish

          Per US federal regulations:
          “The name of the food source of a major food allergen must appear:
          In parentheses following the name of the ingredient.
          Examples: “lecithin (soy),” “flour (wheat),” and “whey (milk)”
          — OR —
          Immediately after or next to the list of ingredients in a “contains” statement.
          Example: “Contains wheat, milk, and soy.”

          While the FDA regulates the claim “gluten-free,” manufacturers are not currently required to explicitly list “gluten” in the ingredients list. This means that you cannot assume that a food without “gluten” listed as an ingredient or without a “contains gluten” statement is safe. (So just because gluten is not listed on the Ring Pop's Nutrition Facts label, don't assume that alone means it is gluten-free!).

          Are you avoiding sesame seed-containing products? Your shopping experience should get a little easier come January 1, 2023. This is because that is when the FASTER Act takes effect and sesame seed becomes an FDA-specified allergen. Sesame seed will then need follow the same labeling requirements as other allergens. More on FASTER in this FDA video…

          Check out this video from the FDA about the FASTER Act as part of this post “Are Ring Pops Gluten-Free? How to Determine if Snacks are Safe!”

          Other ingredients of which the FDA is aware is color and food additives. For example, FD&C Yellow No. 5 does need to be explicitly listed as an ingredient if it is present in a food. So even though Ring Pops are gluten-free, most (if not all) have dyes, and you will see these FDA-certified color additives listed on ingredients lists.

          Step 3. Ask for help!

          Finally, when you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask for help.

          If you don't really know what food your need to avoid, then you need to see an allergist! An allergist will help you determine what foods are triggering an immune response and what foods are non-immune responses. From there, the doctor will be able to guide further evaluation and make recommendations for what foods you need to avoid. The doctor can also provide an action plan for accidental ingestions. This is especially important in kiddos with IgE-mediated food allergies and FPIES.

          And it you are not sure whether an ingredient is found in a particular product or have questions about the sources of ingredients, contact the manufacturer. Most companies have customer service lines and email addresses that you can use to get in touch with someone who can answer your questions. So if you are wanting to learn more information about Ring Pops and whether they are indeed gluten-free, ask the manufacturer about their ingredients! This type of direct questioning, in conjunction with Steps 1 and 2, can be helpful!

          You've got this!

          With these three steps, you can be sure that you are making safe choices for yourself or your child's next snack! And remember, just because a food is safe for one person with a food allergy doesn't mean it's safe for everyone, so if you are serving food to a child who is not your own, check with their parents on what is safe for them. And always check the labels and ingredients before you eat or serve a food, even if it is not a new food – ingredients can change! That means that even though Ring Pops are typically gluten-free, don't take my word for it – take these three steps to make sure those Ring Pops are gluten-free!

          Happy snacking!

          Thanks for reading this post “Are Ring Pops Gluten-Free? How to Determine if Snacks are Safe!” Do you have any questions about food allergies or gluten-free eating? Reach out to me! And be sure to check out my other blog posts and podcast episodes about food allergies and gluten-free living. Thanks for reading!
          – Dr. Hoyt

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Did you know if Ring Pops were gluten-free? Have other food allergy questions? Have them answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your questions HERE!

          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?


          You've just read Dr. Hoyt's post “Are Ring Pops Gluten-Free? How to Determine if Snacks are Safe!” Remember, she's an allergist, but she isn't your allergist, so talk with your allergist about what you've just learned!

          ]]>
          Food Allergy Awareness Month: How You Can Prepare to Spread the Word About Food Allergy https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-awareness-month-how-you-can-prepare-to-spread-the-word-about-food-allergy/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 16:42:57 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=5244 May is Food Allergy Awareness Month, so now is a great time to start preparing to spread the word about this important issue. Millions of kiddos (and adults!) have food allergies, but most people don't really know much about this condition. Food Allergy Awareness Month is a great time to share evidence-based information with your friends and family!

          Here are some ways you can prepare for Food Allergy Awareness Month:

          Update your own knowledge repertoire.

          Whether your family has been dealing with food allergies for under a year or for over ten years, take some time to read about what's new with food allergy. Ask your kiddo's allergist what they've been reading in academic journals about food allergy, and ask for a copy of those articles. Also, check out the research pages on FoodAllergy.org for more great information. The more you know, the better equipped you'll be to answer questions and dispel myths.

          Prepare for food allergy awareness month
          You're learning right now! Way to go!

          Have a list of reliable resources.

          When you're reviewing and sharing information about food allergies, access only evidence-based sources. There are a lot of myths and misinformation out there, so it's important to make sure you're sharing only accurate, up-to-date information. If you have a question about whether a source is solid, reach out to us!

          Some of our favorite resources include:

          Share your own story.

          Whether it's you or your kiddo or both with food allergy, consider sharing your story with others. This is a great way to open up the conversation about food allergies and help others understand what it's like to live with this condition. Many parents are managing at least one medical condition in their children, and opening up the dialogue about this is a great way to mutually support one another. It's also a great way to demonstrate respect and kindness for our children to model.

          Share your story.

          Do something special with your kiddo.

          As kiddos grow up, they internally manage their food allergies in ways we as adults may not totally understand. What's critical is that our children know how much we love them and are here supporting them. Take time now to plan something special to do with them in May, just to show them you love them.

          Plan something special with your special kiddo.

          We hope these tips help you as you prepare for Food Allergy Awareness Month this May! If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to us. We're always happy to help!

          God bless you, and God bless your family!

          At the end of the day, it all comes back to family.

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Stock Epinephrine and the Laws that Support It: Louisiana Edition https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/advocating-for-stock-epinephrine-legislation/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 12:32:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=5199 Did you know that stock epinephrine is a thing? It's true! Epinephrine, also known as adrenaline, is a medication that can stop and treat the life-threatening allergic reaction “anaphylaxis.” Young children may have their first allergic reaction at their preschool or daycare center, so it is important that centers not just have epinephrine but also know how to prevent, recognize, and respond to anaphylaxis. That's where stock epinephrine laws come in – they provide protections for centers to stock this medication and help keep kids safe.

          So what exactly is stock epinephrine?

          In short, it's epinephrine prescribed to an entity, such as a school, to be used in an allergy emergency. The medication is typically stored in an easily accessible location, such as a nurse's office or main office, and can be administered by trained personnel. Epinephrine, when administered from an auto-injector like an EpiPen, is incredibly safe. In fact, it's so safe that states across the country have adopted legislation that supports or sometimes even requires schools to stock epinephrine.

          Unfortunately, not all states have stock epinephrine legislation for K-12 school entities, and fewer states have laws that permit preschools and daycares to stock epinephrine. That is currently the case in Louisiana. Louisiana schools are permitted to stock epinephrine, but Louisiana code does not currently protect early childhood programs in stocking epinephrine. Until now…

          Dr. Alice Hoyt and Rep. Stephanie Hilferty discuss with the media why stock epinephrine legislation for early childhood centers is critical.
          Dr. Alice Hoyt and Rep. Stephanie Hilferty discuss with the media at the Louisiana State Capitol why stock epinephrine legislation for early childhood centers is critical.

          The Bayou State is Protecting its Babies

          My friend State Representative Stephanie Hilferty and I have been working on stock epinephrine legislation for early learning centers, such as preschools and daycares. Rep. Hilferty recently testified to the Louisiana House of Representatives Education Committee that her little boy has food allergy. She was surprised at the lack of protections children have regarding allergic reactions in early childhood programs: because children in this age group cannot always vocalize that they have a food allergy or, worse, cannot verbalize when they are starting to feel an allergic reaction beginning, these children are at risk of delayed recognition and treatment of anaphylaxis. Such delays increase the risk of death from an allergic reaction.

          To help protect all infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, Rep. Hilferty has sponsored Louisiana HB417. I was honored to testify to the Louisiana House of Representatives Education Committee in support of this legislation. It will add stock epinephrine training to the medication administration training that licensed centers already complete, and it will protect centers, center personnel, and epinephrine training organizations (like Code Ana) in their pursuit of creating safer centers for children with and without known food allergies. This means that centers would be able to stock epinephrine auto-injectors to be used during an allergy emergency!

          Dr. Alice Hoyt and Rep. Stephanie Hilferty advocate for stock epinephrine legislation for early childhood centers.
          Dr. Alice Hoyt and Rep. Stephanie Hilferty advocate for stock epinephrine legislation for early childhood centers.

          Stay tuned!

          While the bill passed in the Louisiana House of Representatives, it still needs to pass in thee Senate and make its way to the Governor's desk for signature. We will keep you updated as the bill progresses.

          In the meantime, if you are interested in stock epinephrine legislation in your state, please visit the Code Ana website to learn more and take action. Code Ana is a national program supported by The Teal Schoolhouse, a nonprofit organization working on behalf of the millions of families whose loved ones have food allergies.

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          FPIES with expert Dr. Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/fpies-with-expert-dr-anna-nowak-wegrzyn/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=4992 Not all food allergy disorders involve allergic antibodies! 

          If you have a child with a food allergy, you've likely heard of IgE-mediated food allergies. But there's another type of food allergy that is less well-known – FPIES. Although FPIES is not an IgE-mediated food allergy, it can still be a severe and potentially life-threatening condition.

          Dr. Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn, Professor of Pediatrics in the Department of Pediatrics at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, and the Director of its Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, is the world authority on FPIES. She has authored over 200 peer-reviewed articles and presented at dozens of academic conferences. Simply stated: she's brilliant, and she was kind enough to join Dr. Hoyt on the podcast!

          A bit of background on the food allergy FPIES

          So what is FPIES? FPIES is food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome. When it occurs, it usually presents within the first year of life. It can be triggered by any food, but it occurs more often with cow's milk, soy, rice, and oats. The reaction is not IgE-mediated but rather is a cell-mediated immune response. This response leads to inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract.

          Symptoms of “acute” FPIES reaction can include vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, low blood pressure, and even shock. These acute symptoms occur within a few hours. Some patients have “chronic” FPIES, which presents more often in the first week to months of life and can cause severe failure-to-thrive associated with the gastrointestinal symptoms.

          Unlike IgE-mediated food allergy, FPIES typically resolves!

          Learn all about FPIES and how it's different from other food allergy disorders

          On this episode of the podcast, Dr. Hoyt interviews Dr. Nowak-Wegrzyn. Don't miss learning from this amazing FPIES food allergy expert!

          Food allergy FPIES with Dr. Anna Nowak-Wegrzyn this podcast!
          Tune in for this awesome episode!

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by Dr. Alice Hoyt, Pam, and guests on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          How to Prepare Your Babysitter or Nanny to Manage Food Allergies https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/how-to-prepare-your-babysitter-or-nanny-to-manage-food-allergies/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 09:00:31 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=4822 Young (and not so young!) kiddos have food allergies

          Food allergy affects children (and adults!) of all ages. Studies show that nearly 8% of children have food allergies, and more younger kiddos have food allergies than older kiddos. When kiddos with known allergies have accidental ingestions and reactions, it's often when they are away from their parents, such as when they are at school. Being in the care of a babysitter or nanny can pose similar risks, especially if the caregiver is not well trained to prevent an accidental ingestion, recognize a reaction, and respond to and manage anaphylaxis promptly and appropriately.

          If you have a young kiddo with food allergy, then, at some point, chances are that you will need a babysitter or nanny. Finding the right person for that job is difficult on its own. Add in the challenge of managing a medical condition like food allergy, and you've taken an already serious situation to another level.

          Babysitter Podcast
          Learn how to prepare your babysitter or nanny to manage food allergies

          Prepare your babysitter or nanny to manage food allergies

          To help you on your journey of finding and preparing your babysitter or nanny to care for your kiddo with food allergy, Pam and Dr. Hoyt discuss their strategies for finding the right person for the job and making sure that person is equipped to prevent, recognize, and respond to a medical emergency like anaphylaxis.

          Get the Food Allergy and Your Kiddo Babysitter Guide! Download this concise tool and fill in your most up-to-date information. Tape it onto your refrigerator right next to your kiddo's anaphylaxis action plan and auto-injectors whenever you leave your kiddo with the sitter! Find the guide in Dr. Hoyt's Food Allergy Toolbox.

          Always have this critical food allergy and emergency information easily available for your kiddo's babysitter or nanny.
          Always have this critical food allergy and emergency information easily available for your kiddo's babysitter or nanny.

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by Pam and Dr. Alice Hoyt on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Your State’s Stock Epinephrine Laws https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/your-states-stock-epinephrine-laws/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 09:54:20 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=4456 Where does your state land on Stock Epi?

          What is “stock epi” ? It's epinephrine prescribed to an individual or, more commonly, to an entity. It is to be used in case of an allergy emergency. For example: it's used when someone is having anaphylaxis but does not have their epinephrine auto-injector.

          Most states have legislation on stock epinephrine. (Spoiler: Hawaii does not.) Contents of the laws vary by state. Are you familiar with your state code on Stock Epi? This episode will help you answer that question!

          Stock epinephrine saves lives.
          Stock epinephrine saves lives!

          Epinephrine auto-injectors save lives!

          In this episode, Dr. Hoyt interviews her mentee (future doctor) Maddie Oxford about their recent paper in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice entitled “The Heterogeneity of Stock Epinephrine Legislation in the United States.” Click HERE to access the article, and follow along as you listen!

          ue']

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by Pam and Dr. Alice Hoyt on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          Pam and I volunteer with the non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse. Its primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis.

          Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for everyone at any school. Code Ana's program Med-E Ready is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A response team is also developed! This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          A New Approach to Practicing Food Allergy https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/a-new-approach-to-practicing-food-allergy/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 12:28:52 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=4197 Food allergy management only begins with the correct diagnosis.

          Have you ever wondered how your allergist approaches his/her allergy practice or if there are allergists who focus on food allergy? 

          Dr. Hoyt has launched her new practice, the Hoyt Institute of Food Allergy at the Hoyt Institutes of Allergy, and she's excited to share the story of its development!

          Go behind-the-scenes as Pam interviews Dr. Hoyt about her new food allergy practice.

          In this episode, Pam interviews Dr. Hoyt about how and why she decided to open her own food allergy practice and why she believes that integrated, comprehensive care navigation and mental health support are critical components of her practice.

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by Pam and Dr. Alice Hoyt on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          Dr. Hoyt's new food allergy practice
          Dr. Hoyt has opened her new food allergy-focused practice.

          A note from Dr. Hoyt

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food Allergy 101, Teacher Edition – What Teachers Need to Know! https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-101-teacher-edition-what-teachers-need-to-know/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 11:10:06 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=4191 Great teachers want to understand how to keep students with food allergy safe and included.

          We all know that teachers can make a significant impact on the lives of the children they teach. Some of the greatest teachers are the ones who make you feel like you matter in their classroom and that you can achieve anything you set your mind to doing, and those teachers want all children to be included despite conditions like food allergy.

          We recorded this episode with those amazing teachers in mind! 

          As teachers spend countless hours with kiddos, this episode provides 5 A+ Tips for Teachers who teach kiddos who have food allergies.

          Thank you, teachers, for taking good care of kiddos with food allergy!

          This podcast episode was produced after a teacher contacted us, so we are delighted to share this info with teachers and others who love a school-aged kiddo with food allergy.

          Remember to download our infographic with these tips HERE and share this link with a teacher or parent you know and love!

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by me, Dr. Alice Hoyt, on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          Teachers and food allergy - what to know for a fun, inclusive, and safe classroom experience
          Teachers are awesome, especially when they engage in understanding food allergy.

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Teal Pumpkin – make this your new not-so-spooky tradition! https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/teal-pumpkin-make-this-your-new-not-so-spooky-tradition/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 04:44:34 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=3917 Trick or treat can be less spooky for food allergy families

          If you have a kiddo with food allergy, you know how certain times of the year may cause some angst. You may be concerned about safety. You may be concerned about your kiddo being left out. You may be concerned about both! This espcially may happen around Halloween, which was why the Teal Pumpkin concept was created.

          A teal pumpkin is a fun way to incorporate non-foods treats into your traditional spooky treats.

          So tune into this episode in Pam and I discuss safe trick-or-treat practices for all kiddos plus how a teal pumpkin can easily be added to anyone's traditional halloween treats.

          Plus, don't miss our Teal Pumpkin Mini-Guide!

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by me, Dr. Alice Hoyt, on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          teal pumpkin

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Peanut Oral Immunotherapy – The Preschooler’s Mama’s Experience https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/peanut-oral-immunotherapy-mom/ Fri, 01 Oct 2021 04:25:09 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=3913 What is oral immunotherapy?

          Oral immunotherapy is a way allergists can help their patients with food allergies become less allergic to those foods. Sound too good to be true?

          Oral Immunotherapy, also called “OIT,” is an evidence-based approach to treating food allergy. It carries risks, most notably being anaphylaxis, but many families are researching OIT to determine whether or not this is a good option for them.

          “Is oral immunotherapy right for my child? For my family? For me?”

          OIT has a lot of upsides; however, it is a relatively intense commitment and not right for all families during all seasons of their lives. On this episode of the podcast, Pam and I interview one of my patient's moms to talk about their experience with preschool OIT.

          Tune in to learn more about OIT, then talk with your kiddo's allergist to see if this may bee a good option for your Sweet Pea.

          Son kissing mom for discussing oral immunotherapy with his allergist.
          Whether or not too do OIT is a family decision. It's not the right plan for every kiddo with food allergies!

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by me, Dr. Alice Hoyt, on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          peanut oral immunotherapy

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Who is Dr. Alice Hoyt? https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/who-is-dr-alice-hoyt/ Fri, 02 Jul 2021 04:24:49 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=3885 Learning about the doc behind the mic

          “I'm an allergist, but I'm not your allergist…” I love when my patients recite this back to me (and then say, “But, Dr. Hoyt, I laugh because you actually are my allergist!). This means they've been listening to this show!

          And that's exactly why I do this. I started this blog and podcast to provide families, my patients and beyond, with access to evidence-based information about food allergy that is easy to understand and presented in a positive, uplifting, encouraging way.

          Behind the scenes with me, Dr. Alice Hoyt

          When my amazing cohost and dear friend Pam brought up the idea of finishing out our first season with an interview of me, I thought it was the right thing to do! So many of you write in to me, so I wanted to give you a little more insight into who I am and why I do this.

          So tune into this episode in which Pam interviews me, Dr. Alice Hoyt.

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy questions answered by me, Dr. Alice Hoyt, on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          Dr. Alice Hoyt
          Dr. Alice Hoyt, MD, FAAAAI

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Disney Planning Tips for Families with Food Allergy https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/disney-planning-tips-for-families-with-food-allergy/ Thu, 24 Jun 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=3515 Disney Planning Tips for Families with Food Allergy Read More »

          ]]>
          Disney and food allergy go together like Mickey and Minnie!

          If you've ever been to Walt Disney World, then you know that a lot of planning goes into those magical memories. If your kiddo has food allergy, then you may also know how accomodating Disney is for dietary differences.

          And if you have food allergy and have NOT been to Disney lately or ever, then we've got a treat in store for you!

          Disney sets the bar for managing food allergies.

          Our families love going to Disney because we know that we will have LOT OF SAFE FOOD OPTIONS without having to look too hard and without getting “the look” from the wait staff – ahem, cast members (the official term for Disney employees). In planning upcoming trips, we thought it'd be great to have an authorized Disney travel planner with a FOCUS ON FOOD ALLERGY share her tips with you! 

          So tune into this episode in which we interview Lizzie Reynolds, aka Pixie Lizzie, of Allergy Free Mouseand her own travel company Pixie Lizzie. In addition to food allergy-focused guidance, here are a few tips you'll learn about in this episode!

          Important Disney Travel Tips

          1. Know the weather and time of year you're planning your trip (50 degrees in Florida feels so different from 50 degrees elsewhere!)
          2. Know the parks you want to visit during the time there
          3. Consider working with an authorized Disney vacation planner, many of whom (like Lizzy) are NO CHARGE FOR THE TRAVELERS (planners get $ from Disney!)

          Oh, and also, Pixie Lizzie shares awesome information about the chefs and the food allergy-friendly menus at Disney. 

          There's just so much great content packed into this under 30-minute show!

          Also…
          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy and Disney planning questions answered on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          Disney World Food Allergy

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          5 College-Prep Strategies for Food Allergy Families from FARE’s Kristi Grim https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/5-college-prep-strategies-for-food-allergy-families-from-fares-kristi-grim/ Thu, 10 Jun 2021 16:19:49 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=3323 5 College-Prep Strategies for Food Allergy Families from FARE’s Kristi Grim Read More »

          ]]>

          Prepping for college… when should you start thinking about it?

          (Hint hint: now!)

          In this episode, Pam and I talk with the amazing Kristi Grim of FARE (Food Allergy Research and Education). Kristi has been with FARE for years and was the original lead and continued director of FARE's college programming as well as the lead of youth and of professional education.

          Kristi and her team at FARE have done tremendous work in helping families safely send their kiddos to college. Programs for families include:

          Colleges are taking notice of the increase in food allergies and want more information. To meet this need, FARE has great resources for colleges!

          FARE even gives awards to colleges to honor excellence in food allergy accommodations!

          All this to say, your kiddo can go to college safely despite food allergy. Tune in to hear Kristi's top 5 strategies to preparing for the journey!

          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy college prep and other allergy questions answered on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          College Prep Food Allergy
          Be sure to share this episode!
          ]]>
          Food allergy and counseling https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-and-counseling/ Thu, 27 May 2021 21:36:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=3189 Food allergy and counseling Read More »

          ]]>
          De-Stress with Strategies from Tamara Hubbard, LCPC

          How often do you worry about your kiddo who has food allergy? And have you ever wondered if that amount of worry is “normal” ?

          Tune in to this episode of the Food Allergy and Your Kiddo Podcast with me, Dr. Alice Hoyt, and my good friend Pam Lestage as we interview food allergy counselor Tamara Hubbard, LCPC.

          Tamara is one of the most knowledgeable food allergy-focused counselors in the country. She herself has a kiddo with food allergy and recognized the dearth of mental health support available for families managing food allergies.

          In this episode, Pam and I all with Tamara about the social-emotional challenges that come with loving a kiddo with food allergy and strategies to keep the worries at bay.

          Check out Tamara's podcast Exploring Food Allergy Families Podcast here or where ever you listen to podcasts: https://www.foodallergycounselor.com/podcast.html

          Check out Tamara's counseling site Tamara Hubbard, LCPC here: https://www.tamarahubbardlcpc.com

          Learn more about food allergy and YOUR kiddo through the Food Allergy and Your Kiddo website: https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com

          Are you in need of an allergist in your area? Check out these allergist finder tools from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology:
          AAAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://allergist.aaaai.org/find/
          ACAAI Allergist Finder: 
          https://acaai.org/locate-an-allergist

          Have your food allergy counseling, anaphylaxis, and other allergy questions answered on the podcast!

          Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          food allergy counseling
          Be sure to share this episode!
          ]]>
          Turning anaphylaxis tragedy into purpose https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/turning-anaphylaxis-tragedy-into-purpose/ Fri, 21 May 2021 02:46:37 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2549 Turning anaphylaxis tragedy into purpose Read More »

          ]]>
          Death from anaphylaxis is rare.

          But when it happens to your child, the rarity of it doesn't matter.

          And how do you move forward?

          Here is what the Suhy's do…

          The Allison Rose Foundation is fighting anaphylaxis.

          I'm honored to be joined on this episode with Mike and Becca Suhy of the Allison Rose Foundation. Mike and Becca founded this amazing non-profit to honor their sweet daughter Allison, who passed away from anaphylaxis when she was just a freshman in college.

          Mike and Becca are turning their anaphylaxis tragedy into purpose by creating amazing food allergy educational opportunities for their community. In collaborating with board-certified allergists and the Code Ana organization, Allison Rose Foundation education has reached THOUSANDS of teens and school personnel across Ohio.  

          Tune in to this episode to learn about their daughter, the food allergy education they're leading, and their tips for advocating for your child.

          Tune in to the podcast to hear Ally's story

          Have your anaphylaxis and other food allergy questions answered on the podcast! Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          Be sure to share this episode – share buttons below!

          anaphylaxis Allison Rose
          ]]>
          Food allergy school policies https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-school-policies/ Thu, 13 May 2021 09:00:40 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2143 Food allergy school policies Read More »

          ]]>
          Schools develop food allergy related policies to try to keep kids safe, but how many of these policies are evidence-based? 

          And how do policies impact the emotional well-being of kiddos with food allergy?

          Let's discuss what's being investigated in school policies and food allergy!

          Join me as I talk with my colleague Ashley Lahoud of Kent State University's Pediatric Anxiety and Allergy Research Clinic. There, Ashley and her fellow researchers are studying just how school policies are affecting the mental health of children who have food allergy. By better understanding this issue, we will have more information by which to provide beneficial guidance to academic institutions on developing plans regarding food allergy.

          My favorite part of this episode is that YOU may be able to participate in this research study! If your kiddo is 5-12 years of age and has a food allergy, then you can take the survey and help Ashley and her team better understand the effects of school policies. Take the survey HERE.

          Tune in to the podcast

          What’s your question on food allergy and school policies?

          Would you like your question answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Be a part of the solution – participate in this research survey!

          “School Policy for Parents with a Child who has Food Allergy” is the name of the study. The details… Firstly, parents of kiddos ages 5-12 years are welcome to complete it. Secondly, it'll take about 20 minutes to complete. In other words, pretty short! And thirdly, researchers will hear YOUR VOICE! This can then inform BETTER policies for kiddos like your kiddo!

          BTW, 1 out of 10 participants will win a $25 Amazon gift card! Woot woot!

          Be a part of the solution by taking the survey HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          Thanks for reading! Be sure to share below!

          food allergy school policies
          ]]>
          Food allergy and parenting – the parent needs… https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-and-parenting/ Thu, 06 May 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1667 Food allergy and parenting – the parent needs… Read More »

          ]]>
          When it comes to parenting a kiddo with food allergy, remembering that epi is only one of the many challenges faced.

          Three common themes amongst parents of kiddos with food allergy.

          When it comes to food allergy, parents have needs surrounding three themes: anxiety, the need for resources, and the concept that the experience is truly a journey. These themes were recently identified and discussed in the article “Parents of Children with Food Allergy: A qualitative study describing needs and identifying solutions.” This was published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology in 2020. In reading this article, both my co-host Pam (who is a food allergy mom) and I (a mom and an allergist) nodded our heads the whole read. This article and the themes the authors identified are spot on.

          Series on food allergy and parenting

          What’s your question on food allergy and parent needs? On anxiety?

          Do you have a question about food allergy and parenting, or maybe you’re specifically thinking about the anxiety that can occur? Would you like your question answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Be a part of the solution – participate in this research survey!

          The amazing researchers at the Kent State Pediatric Anxiety and Allergy Research Clinic are studying the impact of school food allergy policies on quality of life in kiddos with food allergy. Awesome, right?!

          “School Policy for Parents with a Child who has Food Allergy” is the name of the study. It's trying to determine how policies impact parents so parent needs ultimately can be met. The details… Firstly, parents of kiddos ages 5-12 years are welcome to complete it. Secondly, it'll take about 20 minutes to complete. In other words, pretty short! And thirdly, researchers will hear YOUR VOICE! This can then inform BETTER policies for kiddos like your kiddo!

          BTW, 1 out of 10 participants will win a $25 Amazon gift card! Woot woot!

          Be a part of the solution by taking the survey HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan.

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          Share this episode today – buttons below!

          food allergy parent needs
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          School, Flying, and Food Allergy – What do the Experts Say? https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/school-flying-and-food-allergy-what-do-the-experts-say/ Thu, 08 Apr 2021 09:00:43 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1063 School, Flying, and Food Allergy – What do the Experts Say? Read More »

          ]]>
          Kiddos have many challenges growing up in this global era, and, unfortunately, food allergy further complicates things like school and flying.

          But that where allergists can help provide you with evidence-based information on how to keep your kiddo safe and still lead a happy life!

          Interview with Dr. Matthew Greeenhawt on School, Flying, and Food Allergy

          On this two-part series of the podcast, I interview Dr. Matthew Greenhawt. He’s the Director of the Food Challenge and Research Unit at Children’s Hospital Colorado. Dr. Greenhawt has authored over 200 journal articles, most of which pertain to food allergy. 

          I’ve previously discussed Dr. Greenhawt’s article “Managing Food Allergy in Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic” when I talked with school nurses about food allergy management during COVID-19. You can find a link to the post and journal article here

          I think you’re going to appreciate Dr. Greenhawt’s no-nonsense, straight-talk approach to evidence-based management of food allergy.

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food allergy on social media – ask an expert, but not on social. https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-on-social-media-ask-an-expert-but-not-on-social/ Thu, 25 Mar 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=856 Food allergy on social media – ask an expert, but not on social. Read More »

          ]]>
          Social media is a relatively new world, and just as navigating the “real” world with food allergy can be challenging, navigating social media with allergy can cause its own issues.

          In theory, social media was intended to be a place where people could connect; however, if misused, it can become a place where kids – and adults! – can be bullied. It can also become an inadequate substitution for real relationships. This includes being an inadequate substitution for typical things we associated with the term “social,” but what about things like medical advice?

          Now, you may be thinking, “Well, Dr. Hoyt, you’re writing on your own website, so are you trying to ride one horse with one behind?” My answer, “No way, Jose!” The information I provide is just that: information. As I say at the end of all my podcast episodes, “I’m an allergist, but I’m not your allergist, so talk with your allergist…” I say that because it’s critical to have a good, real, patient-doctor/parent-doctor relationship with your allergist (shared medial decision making is so so so important). It literally could be the difference between living an unnecessarily anxious, poorly prepared life with food allergy and living your best life equipped with medical advice specific to your kiddo.

          Food allergy on social media with Dr. Dave Stukus

          If you have ever considered how to navigate social media for you and your kiddo regarding food allergy, then you are not going to want to miss this episode. Joining me is Dr. Dave Stukus @AllergyKidsDoc, allergist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Dr. Stukus is also the Social Media Medical Editor of the AAAAI, and he and I discuss social media and how it pertains to food allergy. We also talk about online bullying.

          ALERT: This episode does touch on some serious topics, so consider listening when little ears are not listening.

          Additional Show Notes

          I talked about our non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food allergy and bullying https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-and-bullying/ Thu, 18 Mar 2021 09:00:57 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=820 Food allergy and bullying Read More »

          ]]>
          Bullying comes in many flavors, and when it’s related to your kiddo’s food allergy, it’s even more heart-breaking and can be challenging to address.

          Bullying a kiddo with food allergy – what to do?

          I’m delighted to have on the podcast my friend and colleague Jodi Shroba, CPNP, from Children’s Mercy Kansas City Food Allergy Center. Jodi and I will be discussing bullying.

          • What does bullying look like when a kiddo’s food allergy is part of the bullying?
          • What should parents do if their kiddo is being bullied?
          • How should parents handle bullying when they themselves are the ones targeted?

          Jodi recently presented on food allergy and bullying at the AAAAI 2021 conference, so you are not going to want to miss this discussion!

          What’s your question on food allergy? On bullying?

          Do you have a question about any of these things? Would you like your question answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I talked about our non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Parenting and school preparedness https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/parenting-and-school-preparedness/ Thu, 11 Mar 2021 10:00:48 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=821 Parenting and school preparedness Read More »

          ]]>
          Co-host of the Food Allergy and Your Kiddo Podcast has picked her top three favorite posts! Topics Pam selected included parenting and being prepared for a medical emergency at school.

          Food allergy affects parenting and school life.

          Pam’s favorite episodes are three really tactical episodes regarding parenting, and school. Tune in to this episode to hear why she found it helpful to hear these episodes about parenting, helping schools being prepared for medical emergencies, and shared medical decision making.

          Hint hint… Check out these posts about food allergy, parenting, and school.

          There is so much to consider regarding food allergy, parenting, school!

          Food allergy is a complex issue and, because of that, it impacts all aspects of a kiddo’s life. This is why it’s important to understand as much as possible about the disease and how it can impact a child. With knowledge comes understanding and power, which can help minimize anxiety and, therefore, make life better.

          What’s your question on food allergy? On parenting? On helping your kiddo’s school prevent and be prepared for a medical emergency?

          Do you have a question about any of these things? Would you like your question answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I talked about our non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies, such as anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). So does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Research in treating early food allergy and on preventing anaphylaxis https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/treating-early-food-allergy-and-preventing-anaphylaxis/ Thu, 04 Mar 2021 10:00:12 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=822 Research in treating early food allergy and on preventing anaphylaxis Read More »

          ]]>
          This past week, I attended the AAAAI meeting. My teams and I presented research posters on treating early food allergy and on treating and preventing anaphylaxis at schools.

          So we were pretty busy!

          And, more specifically, we discussed early peanut oral immunotherapy and the heterogeneity of stock epinephrine laws.

          Treating Food Allergy with Early Peanut Oral Immunotherapy

          On this episode of the podcast, I discussed the following abstract/poster:

          Click HERE to read the Abstract #352: A Simplified, Real-World Approach to Safely Inducing Bite-Proof Tolerance in Peanut-Allergic Preschool-Aged Children and Babies​

          If you are interested in checking out the poster, let me know!

          Preventing and Treating Anaphylaxis in Schools

          Also on this episode of the podcast, I also discussed the following abstract/poster:

          Click here to read the abstract. Abstract #059: The Heterogeneity Of State-Specific Epinephrine Training Program Listing Requirements In The United States

          Let me know if you’d like to check out this poster!

          Also, I mentioned the Allison Rose Suhy Act that honors Ally Suhy. The bill:

          • Requires the state provide schools with a list of programs so that the cost of epinephrine auto-injectors is minimized
          • Encourages schools to provide allergist-developed food allergy education for all members of the school community
          • Provides continuing education credit so school personnel receive credit for food allergy education
          • Indemnifies anaphylaxis educators and device prescribers from liability in providing these good Samaritan service.

          Listen now to this podcast about our food allergy research!

          What’s your question on treating early food allergy? On preventing anaphylaxis?

          Do you have a question about treating food allergy or treating and preventing anaphylaxis? If you would you like your question answered on the podcast, then submit here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program. This is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness, so this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school’s food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary).

          So… does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          5 Steps to Medical Emergency Planning at School https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/medical-emergency-response-school/ Sun, 28 Feb 2021 10:00:23 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=824 5 Steps to Medical Emergency Planning at School Read More »

          ]]>
          Medical emergencies can be scary and even scarier at school, but planning a response may seem daunting. So how can your kiddo’s school start to be prepared ?

          Medical emergencies happen, so response planning is critical

          When you think of emergencies at schools, fire drills and intruder alerts probably come to mind, and these are important protocols! Also important is being prepared for medical emergencies, especially considering how many students – and adults – at the school have a medical condition that can become acute and life-threatening.

          On this episode of the podcast, I guide you through the five steps to medical emergency response planning at school:

          1. Take a team approach to plan out goals and a preparedness timeline
          2. Educate all members of the school community on how to recognize and respond to a medical emergency
          3. Develop and implement a medical emergency response protocol unique to the school
          4. Practice and refine the school’s unique response protocol
          5. Continue to refresh on education and the protocol

          Response planning may seem overwhelming at first, but Code Ana really lays out nicely and with a very reasonable timeline how to be better prepared!

          What’s your question on this issue?

          Do you have a question about this issue? If you would you like your question answered on the podcast, then submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I talked about our non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school’s food allergy policy!

          A response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary).

          So… does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food allergy and nutrition strategies https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-and-nutrition/ Thu, 25 Feb 2021 10:00:44 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=823 Food allergy and nutrition strategies Read More »

          ]]>
          If your kiddo has a food allergy, then you may wonder “Is my Sweet Pea getting enough good nutrition despite the food allergy?” Food allergy and nutrition issues are questions that commonly within families of kiddos with food allergy, so I reached out to world renown food allergy and nutrition expert Carina Venter, PhD, RD, to get her take on some hot button topics and provide you with nutrition strategies!

          Food Allergy and Nutrition Strategies on the Podcast

          On this episode of the podcast, the amazing Carina Venter, PhD, RD, and I discuss the following:

          • Nutrition labels in the US versus other countries
          • The microbiome and food allergy (more on that in an upcoming podcast!)
          • What’s changed in food allergy since the mid-2000’s

          What’s your question on food allergy? On nutrition strategies? On the microbiome?

          Do you have a question about food allergy, nutrition, or the microbiome? Would you like your question answered on the blog+podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I’ve talked about our non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is sooo important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Organize food allergy test results https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/how-and-why-to-organize-food-allergy-test-results/ Thu, 04 Feb 2021 10:00:02 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=825 Organize food allergy test results Read More »

          ]]>
          Maybe you have thought about this and somewhat organize your kiddo’s food allergy test results in a binder, or maybe you have the results available online. But just like in school when you have a better understanding of things when you write it out yourself, organizing your kiddo’s allergy test results can help you better grasp your kiddo’s disease process and make sure you and your allergist are on the same page (literally!).

          You may wonder if there is an easy, helpful way to organize those food allergy test results.

          Now there is!

          Food allergy test results can and should be organized

          In this episode of the podcast, Pam and I discuss the benefits of organizing food allergy test results. We go through the Clinical Info Organization tool, which is available in the Food Allergy Toolbox! By using this tool, you will organize your kiddo’s food allergy history, test results, challenge outcomes, and epinephrine expiration dates. In addition to being better organized, you’ll gain a better grasp of your kiddo’s food allergy.

          Additional Notes

          I’ve mentioned the non-profit Code Ana…

          The non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse supports Code Ana, the nation-wide program that equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Code Ana’s School Program is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is sooo important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food allergy testing and immune tolerance https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-testing-tolerance/ Thu, 28 Jan 2021 10:00:52 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=826 Food allergy testing and immune tolerance Read More »

          ]]>
          Yep, you read that title right: food allergy testing is not the be all, end all, as it does not tell us about immune tolerance.

          Did you know that positive skin and/or blood testing does not confirm food allergy is present?

          This is because food allergy skin testing and food allergy blood testing only tell one side of the story – the allergy side. They say nothing about another very important part of the immune system…

          Immune tolerance.

          Immune tolerance is what allows a kiddos to ingest a food without having an allergic reaction.

          If a kiddo has positive allergy skin testing and/or a positive allergy blood testing but also has robust immune tolerance to that food, immune tolerance will outweigh food allergy.

          So it is kind of like a teeter-totter!

          Immune tolerance and food allergy – exploring the relationship

          Learn more on this episode of the podcast!

          And check out this great video on allergy antibodies and this earlier post on immune tolerance.

          Additional Notes

          I’ve mentioned the non-profit Code Ana…

          The non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse supports Code Ana, the nation-wide program that equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Code Ana’s School Program is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is sooo important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          How an allergic reaction really works https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/allergic-reaction/ Thu, 21 Jan 2021 10:00:28 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=827 How an allergic reaction really works Read More »

          ]]>
          Have you ever wondered how an allergic reaction works? Wondered what is going on inside the human body during an allergic reaction?

          And what allows some people to have an allergic reaction while other people don’t have allergies?

          These are some of the questions I’m asked by my families of kiddos with food allergy, so I wanted to share with you what I share with them.

          How an allergic reaction occurs

          In this episode of the podcast, I succinctly explain the pathophysiology behind allergist reactions. I explain where allergic antibodies are positions and how they basically have a party when their allergen arrives, which then activates that allergy cell to spew out cannonballs.

          Yes, I said cannonballs.

          Tune in to this episode and let me know your questions about how allergy reactions work!

          How an allergic reaction happens

          How an allergic reaction works

          Additional Notes

          I’ve mentioned the non-profit Code Ana…

          The non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse supports Code Ana, which equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Code Ana’s School Program is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is sooo important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Goal-setting strategies for an amazing new year https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/goal-setting-strategies/ Thu, 14 Jan 2021 10:00:02 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=828 Goal-setting strategies for an amazing new year Read More »

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          New Year’s resolutions can be stressful, right? Sometimes they seem so pass-fail that you avoid making one at all. That stress often comes from not having goal-setting strategies to help you get from your point A to point B. Does that sound like you?

          Or maybe you think you may have over-committed to your resolution and wondering how you will achieve it?

          And do any of your 2021 goals have something to do with your kiddo’s food allergy

          Whether it’s a personal or professional goal you are setting, good strategies can help you succeed.

          How to achieve your goals

          In this episode of the podcast, my good friend and cohost Pam and I chat about resolutions, SMART goals, and theming your year. We discuss these goal-setting strategies and why we favor certain ones. Which do you prefer?

          Check out the Food Allergy Toolbox, where you can access my downloadable tool about SMART goals and more great resources!

          Tune in to this episode and let us know which goal-setting strategies you prefer! We may share your thoughts on the podcast (no last names will be mentioned, of course!).

          Additional Notes

          I’ve mentioned the non-profit Code Ana…

          The non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse supports Code Ana, which equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Code Ana’s School Program is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is sooo important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food challenge safety: what say the data? https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-challenge-safety/ Thu, 07 Jan 2021 10:00:30 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=829 Food challenge safety: what say the data? Read More »

          ]]>
          The safety of a food challenge is probably the first thing that goes through your mind when your allergist suggests performing a food challenge with your Sweet Pea. You may be thinking, “S/He wants my kiddo to eat ______ even though Sweet Pea may be allergic to it? What if…”

          That’s completely normal and quite an appropriate response! We want to protect our children, not subject them to an allergic reaction.

          So why do a food challenge? And is it even safe?

          In this episode of the podcast, I interview my friend and former fellow Dr. Samantha Knox about her research in the safety of food challenges. You won’t want to miss this episode because we discuss:

          • What is a food challenge?
          • Where should one be performed?
          • How often do kiddos have allergic reactions during this procedure?
          • Are there skin or blood test cut-offs for when to perform a food challenge?
          • How often is epinephrine administered?
          • How often do kiddos need to go to the ER during a food challenge? SPOILER ALERT: not often!

          Additional Notes

          I’ve mentioned the non-profit Code Ana…

          The non-profit The Teal Schoolhouse supports Code Ana, which equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Code Ana’s School Program is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is sooo important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Most Popular Food Allergy and Your Kiddo Podcast Episodes of 2020 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/top-food-allergy-podcast-episodes-2020/ Thu, 31 Dec 2020 10:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1082 Most Popular Food Allergy and Your Kiddo Podcast Episodes of 2020 Read More »

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          Did your favorite Food Allergy and Your Kiddo Podcast episode make the list?

          You can find a podcast on so many topics these days, and I’m so glad that you found this podcast and blog on food allergy!

          I started this blog and the podcast to provide good information on food allergy to families, especially to families of kiddos with food allergy. If you are reading this, it’s probably because you care about someone who has a food allergy. I hope this blog and the podcast are blessings to you!

          Do you have a favorite podcast episode? Is it one of the top 5 most downloaded episodes of Food Allergy and Your Kiddo? Tune in to find out!

          What is your question on food allergy and your kiddo so I can answer it on the podcast!

          Do you have a question about food allergy and your kiddo? Would you like your question answered on the blog and/or the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Can OIT help your kiddo eat safely at a restaurant? https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/oit-eating-out-safely/ Thu, 24 Dec 2020 06:40:13 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1085 Can OIT help your kiddo eat safely at a restaurant? Read More »

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          Oral immunotherapy – OIT – can make kiddos with food allergy like peanut allergy more tolerant of the allergen, but does that tolerance translate into the real world, like when eating at a restaurant?

          The short answer: yes. 

          What is OIT?

          Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a treatment for food allergy. If your kiddo undergoes OIT, the procedure looks like this (in short!): your kiddo will ingest increasing amounts of his or her allergen, once per day, every day, over months to years. This builds immune tolerance. Read about tolerance here

          Of course, OIT should only be performed under the strict supervision and guidance of your allergist. Read more about OIT and early peanut OIT on my previous posts.

          So if your kiddo has food allergy, will OIT help, and what does that have to do with eating out at a restaurant? Well, first, I will say that OIT is not for everyone. Every family is different, and every kiddo with food allergy has a different story with different clinical, social, emotional, and, yes, financial situations.

          Is OIT for everyone with food allergy?

          Actually, can I camp here for a moment? Okay, regarding what I just wrote about every kiddo having a unique situation… that’s so true. Kiddos at certain ages may not be in the right stage of maturity for OIT, or maybe it’s baseball season so OIT just won’t work with the schedule right now. And regarding finances: even if insurance pays for appointments, a parent still has to take off work to go to those appointments, which can mean a smaller paycheck. But if that is your situation, talk with your allergist about ways to work with your schedule. Most allergists want to make this work because it can be a very helpful therapy!

          Is OIT helpful to a kiddo with food allergy when it comes to eating out at a restaurant? Likely, yes.

          Okay, so back to how OIT can help kiddos with peanut allergy be safer while eating out. OIT increases the threshold at which a kiddo will have an allergic reaction. This means that a kiddo’s eliciting dose, which is the dose that causes reaction, would be higher. Translation: it takes more peanut to cause a reaction than before OIT. 

          In the article I discuss in this podcast, the authors discuss how they simulated the possibility of peanut unintentionally getting into what should be a peanut-free dish. Simulating cleaning (or not cleaning – eww) methods, they specify the amount of peanut protein that is likely to contaminate a peanut-free dish. Those amounts of peanut are relevant to the amounts of peanut we try to make the immune system tolerate through OIT and other forms of immunotherapy. Interesting article.

          And it has pictures. Yessss.

          Check out the article here.

          What’s your question on food allergy? On eating out safely at restaurants? On OIT?

          Do you have a question about food allergy, how to eat safely away from home, or OIT? Would you like your question answered on the blog+podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school’s food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary).

          So… does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          How to read a medical journal article https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/how-to-read-a-medical-journal-article/ Thu, 17 Dec 2020 10:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1092 How to read a medical journal article Read More »

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          Have you ever wanted to read an article from a medical journal the way your doctor reads an article?

          Doctors learn how to read medical journal articles and other medical resources. The internet has allowed such medical information to be more easily accessible, allowing doctors to stay up-to-date with best practices. This availability of information also allows patients and families to read the same information that their doctors read.

          Many people want to read the same medical articles from the good journals their doctors read! Is that you? But maybe you don’t know how to read an article from a medical journal?

          Until now!

          Tune into this podcast in which Pam and I discuss how to read an article from a medical journal. Spoiler alert: while many resources say to focus on the abstract and conclusion, I challenge my readers/listeners to focus attention elsewhere: 

          1. The author’s research question, i.e. why was this article written
          2. The method, i.e. how was the research performed 
          3. The results, not to be confused with authors conclusion/discussion! 

          Don’t miss this episode so you can learn how to read a medical journal article like a doctor!

          What’s your question on food allergy prevention?

          Do you have a question about food allergy prevention or food introduction in babies? Would you like your question answered on the infoblogcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school’s food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary).

          So… does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food allergy prevention in babies https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-prevention/ Thu, 10 Dec 2020 10:00:26 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1096 Food allergy prevention in babies Read More »

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          Feeding babies potentially allergenic foods… what does the evidence say about food allergy prevention?

          Recommendations for when to feed babies certain foods have changed over the years, including recommendations on how on food allergy prevention. You may have had one set of recommendations for one child, then with another child, you had different recommendations! So when should babies first have foods like scrambled eggs and peanut butter? 

          We know that early introduction of potentially allergenic foods can certainly help prevent allergy in some children. But how does that actually translate out into practice? How does that directly affect families? 

          Prevention of peanut and other food allergies

          Tune into this podcast with food allergy expert Dr. Brian Schroer, Director of Allergy and Immunology at Akron Children’s Hospital, as Pam and I discuss with him his fantastic article “Practical challenges and considerations for early introduction of potential food allergens for prevention of food allergy,” from the peer-reviewed Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice

          Don’t miss this episode, and click here for the article!

          What’s your question on food allergy prevention?

          Do you have a question about food allergy prevention or food introduction in babies? Would you like your question answered on the infoblogcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I’ve mentioned our non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is sooo important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Sharing the School Program is our primary goal, and that goal is supported in part through Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food allergen labeling made easy! https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergen-labeling/ Thu, 03 Dec 2020 10:00:46 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1100 Food allergen labeling made easy! Read More »

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          Have you ever attended a party and wished the food had been labeled for allergens? I know I have! Food allergen labeling is super helpful!

          IMHO, food allergen labeling makes meals taste better. This is because guests with food allergies feel more confident that the food is safe to enjoy. Labeling foods for allergens can show that the chef – and host/hostess! – has taken the time not just to label safe foods but, in a broader sense, is thinking about food allergy. (Can I get a socially distanced air high-five on that?)

          In this episode of the podcast, Pam and I discuss how to make food allergen labels. In a nutshell (pun intended LOL), food allergen labels should have four main characteristics:

          • Accurate
          • Readable
          • Durable
          • Cute!  

          Don’t miss this episode, and click here to access the Food Allergy Toolbox, which includes the Food Allergen Labeling Guide!

          What’s your question?

          Do you have a question about this topic? Would you like your question answered on the infoblogcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school’s food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary).

          So… does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Online food allergy testing https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/online-food-allergy-testing/ Mon, 23 Nov 2020 10:00:42 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1119 Online food allergy testing Read More »

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          Read this before ordering any “food allergy” testing online!

          Okay, food allergy mama+papa, let’s talk about online food allergy testing.

          There is evidence-based testing and NON evidence-based testing, but differentiating between the two can be challenging, even for the most seasoned food allergy parent! 

          In this episode of the podcast, Pam and I discuss food allergy testing and how you can know what’s worth your time/energy/hope/money and what is not.

          Hint: if you can order it online, then it’s not likely to fall into the evidence-based column.

          What’s your food allergy question?

          Do you have a question about online food allergy testing that you’d like answered on the infoblogcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school’s food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary).

          So… does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Parenting a Kiddo with Food Allergy https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/parenting-food-allergy/ Thu, 12 Nov 2020 10:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1629 Parenting a Kiddo with Food Allergy Read More »

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          Parenting is hard enough, but with food allergy too? Knowing the kryptonite is a great first step!

          Y’all, parenting ain’t easy (can I get a high-five, fist-bump, all from at least 6 feet away, of course), and parenting a kiddo with food allergy takes things to another level.

          You may feel like you are Super Mario and you found the warp zone so just tunneled ahead many lands to a more powerful Bowser. 

          But this Bowser certainly is beatable – you just have to know how to beat him. 

          Just like Superman had kryptonite, we all have our things that can hold us back. When these challenges are in the form of navigating life with a food allergy, the first step to avoiding a bad outcome is to know your allergen.

          That is how Joseph and Linda DiGangi raised their family. They are the proud parents of three boys, one of whom is Joey DiGangi, CEO of tech start-up AssureTech and creator of EpiCenter-App and EpiCenter-Case. Tune in to this episode to hear the DiGangi family talk about parenting and growing up with food allergy. 

          What’s your food allergy question?

          Do you have a question about food allergy and parenting that you’d like answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school’s food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary).

          So… does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Gatherings, Parties, and Food Allergy https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/gatherings-parties-and-food-allergy/ Thu, 29 Oct 2020 09:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1690 Gatherings, Parties, and Food Allergy Read More »

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          Gatherings can be stressful, especially when managing food allergies!

          If your kiddo has food allergies, then gatherings – parties, tailgating, any food-associated get together (which, especially when you’re from the south, is basically any get-together) – can cause stress. You are worried, appropriately so, that your kiddo will eat something to which Sweet Pea is allergic.

          Or maybe you are reading this and planning to listen to the podcast (or maybe you already have!) because you yourself do not have a kiddo with food allergies but are hosting a gathering to which you plan to invite someone with food allergies. If that is that case, then you, like a food allergy mama, are also concerned about an accidental ingestion.

          Important info to know about food allergies before your gatherings…

          An “accidental ingestion” is when someone with a food allergy accidentally eats something to which s/he is allergic. If you have a food allergy and eat something to which you are allergic, you can have a severe allergic reaction. Read more about recognizing the symptoms of an allergic reaction and get a good overview of food allergy here.

          How to prepare for and enjoy parties despite food allergies

          I say it often, “Don’t let food allergy steal your joy.” If you are prepared, first with evidence-based information (as opposed to fake news) then with tactical strategies, then you can enjoy being a guest or a host at an upcoming party despite food allergy. Tune into this podcast as my co-host/food allergy supermama Pam and I discuss strategies to successful gatherings despite food allergy.

          What’s your food allergy and party question?

          Do you have a question about food allergy and parties that you’d like answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school’s food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Wheat Allergy or Gluten Sensitivity or Celiac or Something Else? https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/wheat-allergy-or-gluten-sensitivity-or-celiac-or-something-else/ Thu, 08 Oct 2020 09:00:13 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1791 Wheat Allergy or Gluten Sensitivity or Celiac or Something Else? Read More »

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          Many folks ask me, “Dr. Hoyt, what’s the difference between a wheat allergy and gluten sensitivity and Celiac Disease?” 

          I also get asked, “Is gluten allergy a real thing?”

          This must be a hot topic because my co-host Pam recently had this discussion with one of her friends, so we decided to chat about it on the latest episode of the podcast!

          Wheat allergy versus sensitivity versus Celiac Disease on the podcast!

          Tune in to learn about food allergy versus intolerance and specifically about the many ways wheat can affect our bodies.

          What’s your food allergy question?

          Do you have a question about wheat allergy or gluten sensitivity or Celiac Disease that you’d like answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. In a nutshell (pun???), this program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. A plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program. Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          School nurses are allergy superheroes https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-and-school-nurses/ Thu, 08 Oct 2020 09:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1870 School nurses are allergy superheroes Read More »

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          When you think about what your school nurse does all day, you may think about your kiddo with food allergy (as you should!) and Sweet Pea’s epi auto-injector and action plan. 

          Or maybe you think of ice packs and bandaids? 

          Or maybe school health forms and vaccine records come to mind? 

          School nurses are true superheroes for our kiddos, especially those with food allergy and other chronic disease.

          School nurses have countless tasks and responsibilities. But did you know that they also manage breathing tubes and feeding tubes, help students who can’t use the restroom on their own, and manage medications for all types of medical conditions? All while also being the one who will use the epinephrine to save your child's life if, Heaven forbid, there be an accidental ingestion.

          All this and sometimes for more than one school. Can you imagine? Talk about a job! 

          I was honored to speak with one of my favorite school nurses Tracy White, who is a tremendous advocate for families of kiddos with food allergies. On this episode of the podcast, you’ll hear Tracy discuss how school nurses work with families to provide students the best education possible despite their medical conditions. Listen to learn how you can help your Sweet Pea’s school best support Sweet Pea’s medical needs!

          What’s your question on food allergy and your school nurse? On school?

          Do you have a question about food allergy and talking with your school nurse, or maybe you’re specifically thinking about school policies? Would you like your question answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan.

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          How School Nurses are Preparing for Back-to-School with COVID https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/how-school-nurses-are-preparing-for-your-kiddo-to-come-back-to-the-classroom/ Thu, 10 Sep 2020 09:00:36 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1693 How School Nurses are Preparing for Back-to-School with COVID Read More »

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          Have you ever wondered how school nurses prepare for your kiddos with food allergy? Especially with COVID, how are school nurses getting ready to help their schools take best possible care of students with food allergies?

          I was honored to speak with one of my favorite groups of school nurses and provide guidance on this issue. Now I want to share that session and the resources I used in that session with you!

          Click here to receive the list of my Favorite Back-to-School Resources!

          So what are the Big 8 Recommendations for back-to-school with food allergy?

          Click here for the article that details these 8 recommendations!

          Here are the Big 8 Recommendations from the JACI In Practice article, and school nurses can encourage their schools to apply these recommendations:

          1. Wash hands. Clean surfaces. Don’t share food.
          2. Food allergen bans are NOT medically necessary.
          3. Adapt 504 plans to work with new school restrictions.
          4. Stock epinephrine in all schools!
          5. Train ALL school personnel to recognize and treat anaphylaxis.
          6. ZERO tolerance for bullying.
          7. Unique approaches may be necessary in some schools and classrooms.
          8. Communication is PARAMOUNT to ensure success!

          [

          What’s your question on food allergy and school nurses? On COVID?

          Do you have a question about food allergy and school, or maybe you’re specifically thinking about the COVID? Would you like your question answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          Donate for DeRidder, Louisiana

          Thank you so much to those of you who donated to Code Ana last week to help us feed the food allergy families devastated by Hurricane Laura. Do you feel called to and have the ability to help the people of DeRidder by supporting the families of kiddos with food allergies? If so, then consider making a donation at CodeAna.org. Include in the comment box “DeRidder.” 

          ]]>
          6 Steps to a Successful Evacuation for Your Family with Food Allergy https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/6-steps-to-a-successful-evacuation-for-your-family-with-food-allergy/ Wed, 02 Sep 2020 09:00:31 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1899 6 Steps to a Successful Evacuation for Your Family with Food Allergy Read More »

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          Are you wondering how to have a successful evacuation – hurricane, fire, etc. – with your kiddo who has food allergy? If so, then read on.

          The recent hurricane devastated parts of my home state. 

          Tragic. 

          From this, I was inspired to write an infoblog and record an accompanying podcast about evacuation preparedness for families with food allergy. Specifically, I focus on planning that pertains to families with kiddos with food allergies.

          So what do you need when for an evacuation when also managing food allergy?

          1. Predetermined, comprehensive evacuation plan for your family
          2. Epinephrine auto-injectors ← plural!!! 
          3. Allergy-friendly foods, ice chest, and ice
          4. Other medications and prescription refills
          5. Accoutrements, such as your kiddo’s medical alert bracelet, anaphylaxis action plan, and phone app 
          6. Contact information of your doctors and a doctor and hospital in your evacuation destination city

          Click here to access the Evacuation Checklist for Food Allergies in Dr. Hoyt's Food Allergy Toolbox!

          What’s your question?

          Do you have a question about this topic? Would you like your question answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          Donate for DeRidder

          Do you feel called and have the ability to help the people of DeRidder by supporting the families of kiddos with food allergies? If so, then consider making a donation at CodeAna.org. Include in the comment box “DeRidder.”

          More about the non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program. This is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school’s food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary).

          So… does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Worried about food allergy and anaphylaxis and NOT having epinephrine? This will help! https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/epinephrine-reminder-for-anaphylaxis/ Thu, 27 Aug 2020 09:00:41 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1938 Worried about food allergy and anaphylaxis and NOT having epinephrine? This will help! Read More »

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          Parents of kiddos with food allergy fear anaphylaxis and also that their kiddo won’t have epinephrine.

          Have you or your kiddo ever forgotten epinephrine? Or left it somewhere that can damage it, like a hot car? Likely, the answer is yes. 

          So tune in to this episode in which Dr. Hoyt interviews food allergy college student turned entrepreneur Joey DiGangi. Joey shares his personal journey with food allergy, including his episode of anaphylaxis in a foreign country. Also, he discusses an idea that started in a college class and is now helping food allergy kiddos and adults.

          Click here to access the College Checklist in my Food Allergy Toolbox!

          What’s your question on food allergy and anaphylaxis? On epinephrine?

          Do you have a question about food allergy and anaphylaxis, or maybe you’re specifically thinking about epinephrine? Would you like your question answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan.

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food allergy and food insecurity – the Food Equality Initiative will help. https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-insecure-and-food-allergic-the-food-equality-initiative-will-help/ Thu, 20 Aug 2020 09:00:32 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=1944 Food allergy and food insecurity – the Food Equality Initiative will help. Read More »

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          This is a special episode. Can you imagine having a child who has food allergy and that food insecurity challenges your household? This may be you. If this is you, take heart in knowing that you are not alone in trying to provide safe food for your family. Emily Brown has been there, come out of it, and turned her experience into a mission to help families who are struggling. She founded and leads the Food Equality Initiative, and the work she and her team are doing is changing the lives of families in need.

          What’s your question on food allergy?

          Do you have a question about food allergy, or maybe you’re specifically thinking about food insecurity? Would you like your question answered on the podcast? Submit it here!

          Additional Show Notes

          We discuss food insecurity…

          Food insecurity is more common than you may think and may affect people you assume it doesn’t. The USDA’s numbers below highlight this problem, and these are way pre-COVID.

          This may be you, or you may be in a position and hearing a voice encouraging you to help people who are in such a position. As I said in the podcast, pray about this. Let me know how I can help you!

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan.

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Ingestion challenges for babies https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/ingestion-challenges-for-babies/ Thu, 13 Aug 2020 09:00:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2235 Ingestion challenges for babies Read More »

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          A baby can have a peanut allergy, and the peanut challenge procedure determines that diagnosis.

          You’ve probably heard about doctors recommending babies eat peanut to prevent peanut allergy, and this recommendation differs from that of 20 years ago. At that time, doctors recommended babies avoid this potentially allergenic food. So there were not many ingestion challenges done in babies. Unfortunately, allergists did not have much evidence upon which to make that recommendation. 

          Peanut introduction with ingestion challenges

          But now we have evidence that supports actually introducing peanut – in an age-appropriate, safe way – to babies who are at risk of peanut allergy as a way of preventing the development of peanut allergy. Also, in some babies who have peanut allergy, peanut products may be used to teach the immune system to tolerate peanut. In order to rule out or to confirm peanut allergy, an allergist performs a peanut challenge.

          Does all this sound confusing? I break it all down with my friend and colleague, Dr. Jackie Bjelac.

          Tune in to the podcast to hear about ingestion challenges in babies!

          Have your ingestion challenge and other food allergy questions answered on the podcast! Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Back-To-School Checklist for Kiddos with Food Allergy https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/back-to-school-checklist-for-kiddos-with-food-allergy/ Thu, 06 Aug 2020 09:00:34 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2249 Back-To-School Checklist for Kiddos with Food Allergy Read More »

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          This time of year for your kiddo with food allergy is already stressful.

          Plus, add COVID-19 to the stress of back-to-school, and heavens to Betsy… Where to begin?

          Here’s a checklist to help you be prepared! 

          I have been receiving many questions about back-to-school during COVID-19 and how to navigate pandemic-associated school changes in the context of food allergy. To help families navigate this issue, I created a food allergy back-to-school checklist to guide your planning.

          Tune in to the podcast to learn more about the back-to-school checklist!

          Have your back-to-school and other food allergy questions answered on the podcast! Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Truths and misconceptions about auto-injectors like EpiPen https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/truths-and-misconceptions-about-auto-injectors-like-epipen/ Wed, 29 Jul 2020 09:00:44 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2253 Truths and misconceptions about auto-injectors like EpiPen Read More »

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          Do you know what information is true and what's not true when it comes to epinephrine from an auto-injector like an EpiPen?

          EpiPens and other epinephrine auto-injectors can be intimidating. Plus, no one really wants to give or receive an injection of epinephrine.

          But if your kiddo has a food allergy, chances are you have an EpiPen or some other form of auto-injector. And you probably work hard to try to remember to keep it with/near your kiddo. So what is factual information and what untrue when it comes to that epi?

          Tune in to the podcast to hear about epinephrine truths and misconceptions

          Have your epinephrine and other food allergy questions answered on the podcast! Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Peaches, Pollens, Peanuts, and Food Allergy? https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/peaches-pollens-peanuts-and-food-allergy/ Tue, 21 Jul 2020 09:00:14 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2282 Q&A with Dr. Alice Hoyt on Peaches, Pollens, Peanuts, and Food Allergy

          Peaches, peanuts, pollen, and food allergy: what do they all have in common? Maybe more than you may think!

          “If a person has a peach allergy, then do they have to worry about having an allergic reaction to pollen that may be made by a bee that visited a peach tree?”

          Short answer: highly unlikely.

          Longer answer…

          A person can have immediate onset allergic reactions to peaches in a few different ways. The most common ways are as follows:

          1. Pollen-Related: The person is allergic to a peach protein that is structurally similar to a pollen protein to which he or she is also allergic .  
          2. NOT Pollen-Related: The person is allergic to a peach protein that is unrelated to a pollen protein.

          Pollen Food Allergy Syndrome

          Pollen-Related Peach Allergy is a type of pollen food syndrome. Pollen food syndrome, also called pollen food allergy syndrome, is when a person is allergic to a pollen protein but can have allergy symptoms upon ingestion of produce that contain proteins of similar structure to the person’s pollen allergens.  

          Oral Allergy Syndrome

          Oral allergy syndrome, a type of food pollen syndrome, is when a person with pollen allergy experiences uncomfortable mouth symptoms when eating certain fresh produce. As the name suggests, symptoms are limited to the oropharynx (e.g. the mouth area). In the case of peach, some peach proteins are structurally similar to some pollens. This means that if you are allergic to those pollens, then when you bite into a fresh peach, you may have itchy mouth. The symptoms, while uncomfortable, do not progress to anaphylaxis, hence the name oral allergy syndrome. Important note: heat and digestion alter the protein structure, which is why symptoms do not progress beyond the oropharynx and why they don’t occur with cooked produce.

          Newer literature suggests that another peach protein, which is structurally similar to cypress pollen, can cause peach-induced anaphylaxis. This too is a food pollen syndrome but different from oral allergy syndrome because symptoms are not limited to the mouth.

          Also, peach tree pollen can cause respiratory allergy symptoms.

          But can any of this be related to honey? Rarely. Allergic reactions to honey are quite rare. In fact, many people consume honey hoping it will help with their seasonal allergies (spoiler alert: there’s no evidence that it helps). In most but not all case reports that describe reactions to honey, a bee component or a pollen was the underlying culprit. But again, this is relatively rare. Yet another reason to talk with your allergist if you think this affects you or your kiddo.

          Interesting read: check out this oral allergy syndrome case presentation on the AAAAI website.

          “I ate peaches earlier this week and thought my mouth kinda tingled but ignored it. The next day, the inside of my mouth was sore, but I didn’t know why. Then yesterday I ate peaches again and had the mouth tingling again and my mouth is sore today. Could this be the peaches?”

          Short answer: highly likely.

          Longer answer…

          Fresh peaches can cause the mouth tingling, that being an example of oral allergy syndrome. Peaches and other fruits can also cause a more prolonged soreness and, to some extent, ulcers in the mouth. The underlying pathophysiology of this is less well understood than in other types of food pollen syndromes. While this is rare, it can happen!

          “Can you have a peanut allergy that is actually due to a pollen allergy

          Short answer: yes.

          Longer answer…

          Just like apples and peaches contain proteins whose structures resemble that of birch pollen, peanuts also contain a protein whose structure resembles that of birch pollen. For example, a teenager may have enjoyed peanut butter her whole life but finds that she now is having mouth itching with peanut butter. The itchiness is the only symptom and only occurs in her mouth, and it resolves a few minutes after eating peanut butter.  She also is having significant seasonal allergy symptoms in the spring. The most likely explanation for her new peanut-induced mouth itching is oral allergy syndrome. Specifically, she likely is allergic to a peanut protein that is structurally similar to birch pollen protein. Is she at risk for anaphylaxis? Highly unlikely if this is oral allergy syndrome, but she certainly should see an allergist.

          Bonus question: “Can a child with a peanut allergy have an allergic reaction if he or she smells peanut butter?“

          Short answer: no.

          Longer answer…

          To trigger an allergic reaction, a person’s immune system must become directly exposed to a triggering amount of an allergen. For example, a person with pollen allergy does not have anaphylaxis when she breathes in pollen in the Springtime; however, she can have anaphylaxis to pollen allergy shots because 1) she is being injected with the pollen (route of exposure) and 2) the amount being injected is an amount known to activate the immune system (threshold dose).

          When a kiddo smells peanut butter, she is not inhaling peanut protein; she is smelling the scent of the peanut butter. Now, could smelling peanut butter cause increased heart rate, trouble breathing, nausea, and flushing in someone with a peanut allergy? Yes, but those symptoms, in addition to being symptoms that can occur with an allergic reaction, are also symptoms of an anxiety response. If a person has had an allergic reaction to a food, it is understandable that the food would trigger an anxiety response. Interestingly, many children who are allergic to peanut products spit them out because the taste is so bad to them. (Especially when an allergist is evaluating a young child for possible peanut allergy, this is one subjective symptom that is important to note!)

          So much information about peaches and pollens and peanuts and food allergy!

          We’ve covered a lot in this infoblog post about peaches, pollens, peanuts, and food allergy! If you want to dive deeper on peach proteins, check out this web page by the manufacturer of food allergy tests. Also, I imagine you must have some questions.

          Check out the podcast on peaches, pollens, peanuts, and food allergy!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food allergy and the nutrition label https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-and-nutrition-label/ Tue, 14 Jul 2020 09:00:47 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2288 Food allergy and the nutrition label Read More »

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          Especially during COVID, it’s important to know where to find your kiddo with food allergy safe by knowing where allergensare listed on a product’s nutrition label. Here’s how to do that.

          First step: listen to my latest Food Allergy and Your Kiddo podcast. On this show, I interview food allergy advocate Jen Jobrack. We discuss the history of the nutrition label, what claims are – and are NOT – regulated on food products, and how COVID-19 is impacting the nutrition label.

          Step two of two: access the Food Allergy Mama’s Guide to Identifying Allergens on the US Nutrition Label in the Food Allergy Toolbox. Quick win: save the image to your phone so that you have it with you when you are at the grocery store.

          FALCPA. “Umm, what?” you may be thinking…

          The purpose of FALCPA is to require food manufacturers label the “Big 8” allergens on the nutrition label of their food products. Note that only the Big 8 allergens are required to be noted in a very specific ways. Those “Big 8” include:

          • Peanut
          • Tree Nuts
          • Egg
          • Milk
          • Wheat
          • Soy
          • Fish
          • Crustacean Shellfish

          This means that if you are allergic to something other than the Big 8, your allergen should still be listed within the ingredients list but not bolded or otherwise somehow highlighted.

          The FDA website has lots of information about understanding the entire food label. Check it out here.

          How COVID-19 is impacting kiddos with food allergy including and beyond the nutrition label

          COVID-19 impacts kiddos who have food allergies. Let’s check out a few ways this is happening.

          Relaxation of Ingredients Regulations

          As discussed on the podcast, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has relaxed its labeling requirements during COVID-19. While this does not impact the Big 8 nor should allergens like sesame be impacted, continue to do your due diligence. Listen to Jen’s break down of this situation on the podcast and check out the FDA’s Q&A.

          Food Insecurity

          Although many people may think food allergy is a disease of the affluent, this disease certainly impacts families with little means. The economic impact of food allergy on a family is mind boggling – check out Dr. Ruchi Gupta’s article in JAMA about this issue. So it isn’t surprising that during this COVID-19 pandemic, it can be expensive and difficult to find safe foods. This hits family with lesser means particularly hard. Consider making allergy-friendly donations to your local food bank, and check out this great work from Emily Brown’s brainchild Food Equality Initiative.

          Anaphylaxis Action Plans

          Check with your allergist on this… Some allergists are recommending that, should your kiddo have an allergic reaction and is treated with epi, that you may manage this at home. More on that here.

          About Jen Jobrack

          How awesome is Jen? She is a tremendous advocate for kiddos – and adults – with food allergy. Learn more about her here.

          Listen to the podcast about the nutrition label and food allergy.

          Have your nutrition label and other food allergy questions answered on the podcast! Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Mom challenges https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/mom-challenges/ Wed, 17 Jun 2020 09:00:50 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2293 Mom challenges Read More »

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          Food allergy moms are faced with challenges every day. Things like “do these cookies contain egg” and “I wonder if I should let my Sweet Pea go to that slumber party?” ring in your mind. All this while you also are making sure your kiddo knows to look both ways and take the ear buds out of her ears before crossing the street.

          Keeping your kiddo safe is your number one priority, and recognizing and responding to the challenges of food allergy can be daunting. To share her experiences and lessons learned, I recently interview food allergy mama Pam Lestage for my new “Food Allergy and Your Kiddo” podcast. Pam and I discuss challenges that she and her family have faced. Has your family faced the same challenges?

          You can RISE UP to overcome challenges!

          When was the last time you had a problem situation regarding Sweet Pea’s food allergy but didn’t quite know how to approach it? Probably recently! That’s because food allergy is a 24/7 issue, especially with kiddos. Perhaps you are trying to get a favorite aunt to understand that Sweet Pea cannot eat eggs. Or maybe you are trying make the school understand that epinephrine, not antihistamine, is the first-line treatment for anaphylaxis. Whatever it is, you have to start somewhere. If you haven't already done so, check this out! Use it to help you rise up to any challenge!

          Additional Show Notes

          During the show, we talked about peanut butter. Did you know that peanut in its directly-out-of-the-jar-peanut-butter form should not be given to children under the age of four years? This is because it is sticky and can be a choking hazard! Instead, thin peanut butter with water for a safer consistency. Questions about this? Be sure to ask your allergist about when – and HOW – to introduce/feed peanut-containing foods to your kiddo.

          Tune in to the podcast to hear about overcoming the challenges that accompany being a food allergy mom.

          Have your mom challenges and other food allergy questions answered on the podcast! Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Food allergy podcast https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/food-allergy-podcast/ Tue, 16 Jun 2020 09:00:35 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2297 Food allergy podcast Read More »

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          Demystifying Food Allergy via Podcast

          I am so excited to demystify food allergy through my new Food Allergy and Your Kiddo podcast!

          The infoblogcast – infoblog + podcast – is live! I hope you enjoy listening to this first episode of Food Allergy and Your Kiddo Podcast. So, to introduce this podcast, this episode is an overview of what’s to come on the podcast. I’m doing this to help demystify food allergy by answering your questions about what can be a strange and scary disease. Knowledge is empowering, and empower you is what this podcast will do.

          Remember to subscribe so that you know when more episodes are available (approximately every week!).

          Tune in to hear food allergy begin to be demystified in the first Food Allergy and Your Kiddo Podcast!

          Have your food allergy questions answered on the podcast! Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Show Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Peanut Allergy Oral Immunotherapy (OIT) Palforzia https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/peanut-allergy-oral-immunotherapy-oit-palforzia/ Wed, 20 May 2020 15:58:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2533 Peanut Allergy Oral Immunotherapy (OIT) Palforzia Read More »

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          Peanut allergy has an FDA-approved OIT treatment

          Peanut allergy affects 2-5% of children. The treatment plan for peanut allergy recommended by most academic allergy centers is avoidance of peanut – perhaps until now. Hello, Palforzia, the only FDA-approved treatment for peanut allergy. Palforzia works through the treatment process called oral immunotherapy (OIT). Read on to learn more about peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) and Palforzia.

          What is Oral Immunotherapy (OIT)? 

          Oral immunotherapy – known as “OIT” – is a way to teach the immune system to tolerate a food. For over a decade, private practices have been utilizing OIT protocols to help patients with food allergies. In addition, academic institutions have helped patients. They play a major role in providing a better understanding OIT, such as how the treatment works and the safety of this treatment. OIT is based on the principles of classic pollen immunotherapy, such as “allergy shots.” Furthermore, allergy shots have been used for over a century to teach the immune system to tolerate environmental allergens, such as pollens

          Allergy versus Immune Tolerance

          If you haven’t yet read my infoblog Allergy Versus Immune Tolerance, take a few minutes to read it. It will provide important insight into this topic.

          How does OIT work?

          OIT works by slowly exposing the immune system to small, increasing amounts of the allergen over a prolonged period of time. This treatment MUST be done under the direct supervision of an allergist because there is a risk of severe allergic reactions. Over time, the immune system essentially gets used to the allergen. In other words, the immune system becomes “tolerant” of the food. The level of tolerance is patient-specific. More on this later. 

          Palforzia and Other Forms of Allergen in Peanut OIT

          OIT protocols typically use one of two types of allergen approaches: pharmaceutical/research-grade allergenic protein, or supermarket products. Palforzia is a pharmaceutical product with quite exact amounts of peanut protein per capsule. Your allergist will tell you how many capsules your kiddo will need for each dose of OIT. Capsules are not to be directly swallowed but should be opened into a refrigerated or room-temp food, mixed, then consumed. Many allergists prefer this approach over using supermarket products. They prefer it because of the well-measured amounts of peanut proteins per capsule. Alternatively, private practices have had success with OIT when using supermarket products, such as peanut flour and and other peanut products. Ask your allergist which approach is right for you, and read the package prescribing information for Palforzia here.

          OIT Timeline

          Four phases make up the OIT Timeline: Escalation, Build-Up, Maintenance, and Post-Maintence. I call the Post-Maintenance phase the “TBD” phase (see the OIT Table). After Maintenance, some patients may be able to eat their allergen whenever they want and in whatever quantity they want. That being said, “bite proof” is the limit of some patients’ tolerance. “Bite proof” means that the patient can ingest a bite of the food without having a reaction, but more than a bite of the food may cause a reaction (though hopefully a less-severe reaction than if the patient had not undergone OIT). 

          Phases of OIT

          OIT is a multi-year process and should only be performed under the supervision of an allergist.
          See the “Phases of OIT” Table below to learn about each phase.

          peanut allergy OIT

          Risks and Time Commitment with OIT

          OIT is a good treatment option for many patients with food allergy, but patients and their families need to consider the risks and commitment prior to starting therapy. 

          Risks of OIT

          This treatment can cause allergic reactions including anaphylaxis. OIT requires direct supervision of the child for two hours, during which time the child cannot exercise because exercise lowers the threshold for anaphylaxis. Other risk factors for anaphylaxis include sickness, fever, and NSAIDs. In adolescent and adult patients, patients must avoid alcohol as it too increases the risk of allergic reaction. To minimize the risk of reaction, kiddos undergoing OIT should take their doses at the same time every day. Patients should only take the dosage prescribed by the allergist, never more. Also, some patients have developed eosinophilic esophagitis, which is a food allergy that affects the esophagus. 

          I can’t say it enough: OIT requires allergist supervision, and it is not the right treatment plan for everyone.

          Time Commitment with OIT

          Then there is the time commitment. OIT requires the patient take the prescribed dosage of allergen every day. Patients cannot miss doses and must have direct supervision for two hours after each dose. Supervision must be by someone who knows how to recognize and respond to an allergic reaction. This can be challenging for some families who are in a very busy season. 

          What’s next for Peanut OIT, Palforzia, and other food allergies?

          I hope you’ve enjoyed reading about peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) and Palforzia. Whether you support pharma-OIT products or supermarket-OIT products (or both!), I imagine you are excited about the progress in the world of food allergy treatments – I am! OIT is not right for every patient. In fact, allergen avoidance is a solid treatment plan for many patients. Talk with your allergist about what’s best for your kiddo!

          Have your peanut allergy OIT and other food allergy questions answered on the podcast! Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

          ]]>
          Early Peanut Oral Immunotherapy (OIT) https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/early-peanut-oral-immunotherapy-oit/ Fri, 15 May 2020 15:11:00 +0000 https://foodallergyandyourkiddo.com/?p=2498 Early Peanut Oral Immunotherapy (OIT) Read More »

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          Early Peanut Oral Immunotherapy (EPOIT) can decrease the severity of peanut allergy in young children. Say what?!

          Let’s discuss early peanut oral immunotherapy (EPOIT).

          “So let me get this straight: she’s allergic to peanut. But if we slowly start giving her tiny amounts of peanut, her allergy can decrease?“ Baby Sweetpea’s mom asked her allergist.

          Her allergist replied, “That pretty much sums it up.”

          What is OIT?

          OIT—oral immunotherapy—is a treatment. It is not a cure. It is a treatment for food allergy.

          This treatment involves slowly exposing a person’s immune system to the person’s allergen. That’s the “immunotherapy” part. In food allergy, the most common route of immunotherapy is by mouth. That’s the “oral” part. In peanut OIT, the peanut-allergic patient ingests peanut.

          Check out my earlier infoblog post on OIT.

          What is early peanut oral immunotherapy (EPOIT)?

          Early peanut oral immunotherapy (EPOIT) is a form of immunotherapy for young children.

          Children ages 4 months through 3 years typically define “early” in early OIT. These patients have peanut allergy. This means they have an allergic reaction to peanut. Sometimes, however, babies who have not yet ingested a peanut-containing food but have elevated allergy tests or other risk factors may be candidates for early peanut oral immunotherapy.  

          Depending on the allergist performing EPOIT, the form of peanut used as treatment can vary. Of course, nuts are choking hazards in this age group. Because of this hazard, EPOIT protocols use peanut powders, peanut flours, and peanut butters diluted with water. Just as with OIT in older age groups, patients undergoing EPOIT ingest daily doses of the specified peanut product. The starting dose of therapy is super low, often microgram doses! Patients go into the allergist’s office every 1-2 weeks for up-dosing of their treatment. They do this until they reach their maintenance dose. Maintenance dosing varies per protocol. Allergists typically continue maintenance dosing for at least one year before repeating allergy testing. Patients undergo EPOIT under the strict supervision of food allergists.  

          Early peanut oral immunotherapy (EPOIT) is what I often refer to as LEAP 2.0. Let’s revisit LEAP…

          LEAP is the study “Learning Early About Peanut.” In this study, babies (4-11 months of age) who were at risk of peanut allergy were stratified into one of two groups: peanut-consumption group or peanut-avoidance group.

          • “At risk” of peanut allergy means the baby had 1) severe eczema, or 2) egg allergy.
          • All babies had skin prick testing (SPT). Read more about allergy testing here.
          • Positive (+) SPT = 1-4 mm wheal
          • Negative (-) SPT = 0 mm wheal 
          • SPT >4mm = the study excluded these babies. 
          • The study defined “peanut consumption” as 6 grams of peanut protein per week. Bamba served as a main form of peanut protein.

          The primary outcome of LEAP was whether or not babies were allergic to peanut at 5 years of age. Ingestion challenge determined the presence of peanut allergy. An ingestion challenge is a procedure in which a patient consumes the allergen in question and is monitored for symptoms. More about that here.

          LEAP found that at-risk children who consumed peanut were significantly less likely to have peanut allergy by their 5th birthday when compared to at-risk children who had been avoiding peanut.

          The LEAP On Study immediately followed the LEAP Study.

          LEAP On tested the sustainability of this tolerance (read about allergy vs. tolerance here). In LEAP On, babies from both the peanut-consumption and peanut-avoidance groups were advised to avoid peanut for one year. They were then tested for peanut allergy at six years of age. Peanut ingestion challenge determined allergy status.

          LEAP On found that children who had consumed peanut until five years of age were still significantly less likely to have peanut allergy after a year of peanut avoidance compared to at-risk children who had been avoiding peanut since they were babies.

          New(ish) Recommendations for Introduction of Peanut Products to Babies

          So now maybe you are wondering…

          “Even an at-risk baby with positive skin testing can be tolerant of peanut if the baby begins consuming peanut at a young age. But in LEAP, babies with SPT >4mm were excluded. So should babies who have SPT >4mm avoid peanut?”

          Not necessarily.

          After LEAP and LEAP On, food allergy management recommendations changed. In 2017, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) published new recommendations. These new recommendations are summarized in the table “Summary of the NIAID Peanut Introduction Recommendations.” In short, if a baby is at risk of peanut allergy s/he should be further evaluated with allergy testing. If s/he is not at risk, then age-appropriate peanut products can be introduced as early as 6 months of age. This is in keeping with the WHO and AAP recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life.

          Age of introduction is based on risk factors for peanut allergy.

          “But what if my baby has milk allergy? Or what if her brother has peanut allergy? Are those risk factors?” Not according to these newest guidelines. That is why it’s important to see an allergist—so that your child’s evaluation can be personalized to her clinical presentation.

          Peanut Allergy Prevention Recommendations In Action

          At-risk babies are evaluated for likelihood of peanut allergy through skin and/or blood allergy testing. Which testing your doctor performs typically depends on whether or not the doctor is an allergist. Most pediatricians and family medicine doctors do not have access to skin testing, so they may order a blood test . If the blood allergy test is negative, then allergy is unlikely. The doctor then may advise introduction of an age-appropriate peanut product. 

          In my experience, many non-allergy docs prefer referring at-risk patients to the allergist for further evaluation. While the allergist may perform blood testing, s/he is also likely to perform skin prick testing. Based on the NIAID recommendations, skin prick testing provides guidance on whether peanut should be introduced and, if so, how. Check out the table labeled “Summary of NIAID’s Peanut Introduction Recommendation Based on Skin Testing.”

          Method of introduction in babies at risk of peanut allergy is based on history and test results.

          Application of Recommendations to Prevent Peanut Allergy

          All that being said, many food allergists perform in-clinic peanut challenges despite a positive blood test and/or a large skin prick test. This is because neither skin testing nor blood testing are not 100% accurate for diagnosing food allergy (more on that here). Ingestion challenge is the gold standard to make the diagnosis of food allergy. If a child has a negative peanut challenge, then the allergist likely will recommend continued ingestion of peanut to sustain that tolerance. If a baby as a positive peanut challenge, avoidance is often recommended…

          But not always. Not anymore! This is when early peanut oral immunotherapy can be helpful.

          Please note: early peanut oral immunotherapy is not an FDA-approved treatment for peanut allergy. 

          There is no FDA-approved treatment for peanut allergy in this age group. The only FDA-approved treatment for peanut allergy is Palforzia. The FDA approved the initiation of treatment in patients ages 4-17 years old. Patients older than 17 years can continue treatment. This means that children younger than 4 years old and adults do not meet criteria for Palforzia.

          But do some allergists do OIT other than Palforzia, using food or food powders/flours? Yes.

          Safety and Efficacy of Early Peanut Oral Immunotherapy 

          Do some allergists do early peanut OIT? Yes. But is it safe? Let’s go through a few journal articles to answer that question.

          Article #1: Vickery et al studied early peanut OIT in a research setting.

          This is one of my favorite papers, the title of which is “Early Oral Immunotherapy in Peanut-Allergic Preschool Children Is Safe and Highly Effective.” In this study, preschool-aged children with peanut allergy received either low or high dose peanut oral immunotherapy. Not only were both doses quite successful in inducing tolerance to peanut, but the low dose of peanut protein seemed equally as effective in inducing tolerance but with a better side effect profile than the high dose. 

          Most of the children in the study achieved sustained unresponsiveness. Sustained unresponsiveness occurs when somebody who previously had a food allergy undergoes OIT and is then able to ingest the food without having an allergic response to it. This study followed these children after five years, and most of them continued to ingest peanut without having reactions. One of my favorite parts of this story is that the families reported an improved quality of life.

          Article #2: Soller et al studied early peanut OIT in a community setting.

          Soller’s team performed EPOIT—which they referred to as preschool P-OIT—and confirmed the safety findings of Vickery’s research but in a community setting. Regarding feasibility, this real-world approach to EPOIT used real food, specifically peanut butter powder and Bamba. Vickery’s study, used encapsulated peanut protein.

          Note the Safety…

          There were children from both cohorts who did have allergic reactions. Rarely, these reactions were severe. This underscores the importance of the strict supervision and guidance of a food allergist for patients undergoing oral immunotherapy.

          early peanut immunotherapy

          Each phase of EPOIT is performed under strict guidance of the kiddo’s allergist. 
          Note: one peanut contains approximately 250-300 mg Peanut Protein (PP).

          Note the Controversy…

          Most allergists agree that oral immunotherapy is effective. That being said, allergists don’t always agree on how OIT is administered. Many allergists feel that OIT should be administered only when using an FDA approved product, such as Palforzia. Otherwise, OIT should only be used in a research setting. Others feel that using foods from the supermarket is equally effective and safe. Ask your allergist for his/her thoughts.

          Is Early Peanut Oral Immunotherapy (EPOIT) right for your child?

          Ask your allergist. 

          EPOIT may or may not be the best approach to your child’s peanut allergy at this time. Regardless, you are now more informed on this therapy. 

          So much information about food early peanut oral immunotherapy (EPOIT)!

          We’ve covered a lot in this infoblog post! I imagine you must have some questions. Send them my way!

          Have your peanut oral immunotherapy and other food allergy questions answered on the podcast! Submit your question HERE!

          Additional Notes

          I have talked about a non-profit…

          The non-profit is The Teal Schoolhouse, whose primary program is Code Ana. Code Ana equips schools for medical emergencies like anaphylaxis. Our primary program is the Code Ana School Program, which is a comprehensive approach to school-focused medical preparedness. This program guides schools through the process of creating a medical emergency response plan. This is one of the most important components of a school's food allergy policy!

          A medical emergency response plan is important for all kiddos and for adults at any school! Our primary goal is to share the School Program, and Code Ana’s Online Epinephrine Training Program helps support that goal. Through this program, you will educate yourself while you support this important mission! (BTW although Pam and I serve in leadership roles of Code Ana and The Teal Schoolhouse, our time/effort/work is completely voluntary). Does your kiddo’s school have Code Ana?

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